The Muse

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
The Muse Movie Poster Image
Satire, Hollywood in-jokes won't appeal to kids.
  • PG-13
  • 1999
  • 97 minutes

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Issue of husband being threatened by wife's succes.

Violence
Sex

Mild.

Language

Mild.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Social drinking, references to alcoholism.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that there's some suggestion that Sarah is mentally ill, but it's intentionally left vague enough so that each viewer can decide if she's really a muse after all.

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What's the story?

In THE MUSE, writer/director/actor Albert Brooks portrays Steven Phillips, a Hollywood screenwriter who is let go by the studio when a young, arrogant executive tells him he has lost his "edge." On the advice of a friend, he seeks inspiration from a muse (Sharon Stone), the daughter of Zeus, who now lives in Los Angeles under the name "Sarah." Sarah does indeed work miracles for Steven, inspiring him to write a successful script. But Sarah is demanding. She insists on lavish gifts and constant attention. And she is frustrating. Steven wants her full-time dedication, but she is busy inspiring his wife to start a cookie business and Titanic writer/director James Cameron to make something other than a sequel.

Is it any good?

This movie's satire and Hollywood in-jokes will have little appeal to kids, but Stone's performance as the ravishing, maddening, and truly inspiring muse is wildly funny. The film can lead to family discussions about art and about relationships. Kids may also want to look up the mythological muses and talk about the costs and benefits of being inspired.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about art and about relationships. Kids may also want to look up the mythological muses and talk about the costs and benefits of being inspired.

Movie details

For kids who love comedies

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