The Return of Jafar

Movie review by
Scott G. Mignola, Common Sense Media
The Return of Jafar Movie Poster Image
A genie that should have stayed in the bottle.
  • G
  • 1994
  • 66 minutes

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Alladin once again must stand up for what he believes and displays courage and tenacity.

Violence & Scariness

An evil genie bent on revenge frames Aladdin for murder and imprisons his pals.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

As with most Disney films, products have been made of these characters. The video itself is part of the franchising of a great film, Alladin.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this made-for-video sequel to Aladdin may disappoint those looking for Disney's usual feature quality, but will entertain fans eager to see the story continue. But those wishing for more of the franchise would be better served by watching Aladdin and the King of Thieves, in which Robin Williams returns as the voice of the Genie. Young ones will like the music and colorful characters, but may run behind the couch when mean old Jafar appears. A cute monkey, an obnoxious parrot, and sword-banging action should fives, sixes and sevens riveted. Okay for die-hard fans of Aladdin, but the labored plot may cause restlessness in older viewers.

Wondering if The Return of Jafar is OK for your kids?

Parents: Set preferences and get age-appropriate recommendations with Common Sense Media Plus. Join now

Continue reading Show less

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 11 years old December 3, 2019
Kid, 12 years old April 4, 2019

Not that good

While the first Aladdin Was a masterpiece, that means that this had alot to live up to, which it don't. I don't like this, and Robin Williams isn... Continue reading

What's the story?

In this made-for-video sequel, wicked Jafar returns to Agrabah after a clumsy bandit sets him free from the lamp in which he was imprisoned. But, because he must obey the genie's law and not kill on his own, Jafar uses his rescuer as a tool of revenge against his wrongdoers. Aladdin, Jafar's primary target, is now a royal advisor. He manages to stay in the good graces of the Sultan and Princess Jasmine until Iago the parrot, obeying Jafar, double-crosses him. With his friends in chains, Aladdin must first prove that he didn't kill the Sultan, then find a way to destroy Jafar's lamp, thus destroying Jafar.

Is it any good?

THE RETURN OF JAFAR has the general look of its predecessor, but this made-for-video sequel doesn't possess the wit or integrity of Disney's Aladdin. The cast is mostly the same, with welcome newcomer Jason Alexander as the greedy thief Abis Mal whose lamp-rubbing sets Jafar loose. The obvious missing ingredient here is Robin Williams, whose manic ad-libbing as the blue Genie in Aladdin had animators scribbling madly to keep up. He's replaced by Dan Castellaneta, who does a fine job but lacks Williams' spontaneity.

New songs yield a couple of good production numbers. They don't help the story much, though, which five people are credited with thinking up, and eight people(!) are credited with writing. The elements are all there -- they just lack focus and ingenuity. For that, blame the three directors and two producers.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about where they get the courage to do things they are scared of. How did Alladin find work up the courage to free himself and his loved ones? How do you react when you've been accused of something you didn't do?

Movie details

Our editors recommend

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

Streaming options powered by JustWatch

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality.

Learn how we rate