The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let's Do the Time Warp Again

Movie review by
Joyce Slaton, Common Sense Media
The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let's Do the Time Warp Again Movie Poster Image
Remake of raunchy cult classic lacks spark of original.
  • NR
  • 2016
  • 88 minutes

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

As always, the movie's main worth is measured in camp value. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Ultimately most of the film's characters betray each other, though messages are hard to discern through campy costumes, music, and plot twists.

Violence

One character stabs another and then falls out of a window; the sequence is played for laughs, with the stabbed character giving the stabber a dirty look. A servant is whipped for a misdeed; partners give each other's behinds swats in bed and take evident pleasure in it. In one song, a woman is slapped, kicked, and pushed by a physically much larger character.

Sex

Many of the naughtier twists viewers may remember from the original movie are left out: Rocky's little gold shorts are now surfer's jams. Couples do cuddle and kiss in bed while scantily clad and talk about sex in a veiled way: "I've never!" "Thrill me, chill me, fulfill me!" One song talks about cross-dressing and transexuality; a main character seduces both men and women. While a woman is unable to move, another character strokes her body as she shrieks, and the camera lingers on her breasts. 

Language

Infrequent cursing; one song, "Dammit Janet" has the word "dammit" a lot. There are double entendres about "hot groins" and things that "grow" while a character poses. 

Consumerism

Brands are obscured in a scene set at a movie concession. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Characters drink cocktails at dinner and celebratory moments; no one acts drunk. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let's Do the Time Warp Again is a remake of the 1975 film with a new cast. Many of the bawdier jokes from the original movie are softened for network TV: There's no nudity (all nipples remain covered, though cast members do wear very tight and brief costumes, including underwear) and few of the super-raunchy moments. There is a lot of kissing and references to body parts (a "hot groin") and sex (an "orgasmic rush of lust"). One character seduces a man and woman in turn; we see them in bed cuddling and nuzzling and smacking each other on the behinds. A song discusses the joys of cross-dressing and gender variance; another uses the word "dammit" repeatedly. Characters who act as if they're boyfriend and girlfriend reveal themselves to be siblings late in the movie. A character is stabbed and thrown out a window; we later see his dead body in a coffin being used as a table. A woman is slapped, kicked, and pushed during a song; later a character strokes her body while she's physically incapacitated and screaming.

User Reviews

Adult Written byaristotler December 2, 2017

Representation in leading role

A great remake and holds all the same great qualities of liberal exploration of sexual orientation and gender identity. The only thing that makes this better is... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byQuinn Nichols November 29, 2017

Good movie

Good movie a lot of music.
Teen, 15 years old Written byGracie_Sroka January 4, 2018

A Great Remake!

The movie is great and as an aunt, I would let my niece and nephew watch with me. The movie definetly hits the mark along side the original cult classic. I thin... Continue reading

What's the story?

Based on the original 1975 cult classic movie, THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW: LET'S DO THE TIME WARP AGAIN is a television remake with an (almost!) all-new cast. Laverne Cox takes on the now-gender-flipped role of Dr. Frank N. Furter, while that role's originator, Tim Curry, is now the narrator/criminologist relating the nefarious goings-on at the Frankenstein Place. One fateful night, straitlaced couple Brad Majors (Ryan McCartan) and Janet Weiss (Victoria Justice) have car trouble while returning from a wedding. Intent on finding a phone, they visit a foreboding castle to find creepy servants Riff Raff (Reeve Carney) and Magenta (Christina Milian), as well as flippant groupie Columbia (Annaleigh Ashford) and a whole lot of punk rock weirdos in the middle of a very strange party. You see, tonight's the night the Master's going to bring his new creation, Rocky (Staz Nair) to life. But before the night is over, Frank, Brad, Janet, and all the rest get more than they bargained for. 

Is it any good?

The cast does tolerably, and the jump to TV doesn't dial down the naughtiness too much -- it's just that this comedy has lost some joy in translation. Without the cult history of the original, The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let's Do the Time Warp Again is simply a campy musical, albeit one whose messages about gender and sexuality have aged remarkably well. The idea of a bisexual character is no longer shocking, nor is one who enjoys cross-dressing (though since Cox is a trans woman who spends the majority of the film's running time dressed in sparkly and brief lady-dancer costumes, that bit might be a tad confusing to new viewers); the songs have held up, and so has the idea of satirizing an old-time movie. 

Cox is no Tim Curry, though she seems to be doing an imitation of him, with a terrible English accent that frequently lapses into New Zealand-ish tones, particularly when she calls for "Bred" and "Jehnet." For that matter, few members of the cast give performances as lovably idiosyncratic as the originals and frequently seem to be trying to give the exact same line readings as their predecessors. Which asks the question: If you're going to do a shot-for-shot remake and add nothing but a new cast imitating the old cast, why bother? 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the themes of The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let's Do the Time Warp Again and how they resonate now. What do the protagonists learn about themselves? Why is it important to be yourself?

  • Families can also talk about cult classics. Why do you think this particular story struck a chord with so many people? 

Movie details

For kids who love musicals

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