The Scarlet and the Black

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
The Scarlet and the Black Movie Poster Image
Outstanding story of moral courage and redemption.
  • NR
  • 1983
  • 143 minutes

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages
Violence

Tense situations, some war casualties.

Sex
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this movie, set during WWII and based on a true story, has no objectionable content and is a moving example of true personal moral courage and redemption

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byElizabeth Darcy October 19, 2011

Wonderful, uplifting movie

This a truly great but under-appreciated movie about heroism and self-sacrifice. Full of great role models and positive messages. The violence is minimal and no... Continue reading

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What's the story?

Based on a true story set in WWII Rome, THE SCARLET AND THE BLACK stars Gregory Peck as Monsignor Hugh O'Flaherty. O'Flaherty used the Vatican, which had diplomatic neutrality, as a base of operations to save thousands of Allied POWs, in a long, elaborate, and deadly game of cat and mouse with German Colonel Herbert Kappler (Christopher Plummer). As Italy is falling to the Allies, Kappler knows the war is over. He seeks out O'Flaherty, his bitterest enemy, to ask a favor: to draw on the same resources he used to help the POWs escape to get Kappler's family to Switzerland. Kappler does not find out until he is being interrogated by the Allies that his family is safe, and he protects O'Flaherty from charges of collaboration by refusing to give any information about his operation, even though it would have shortened his sentence.

Is it any good?

This exceptional movie presents us with an assortment of characters who each try to do what they believe is best to protect the values they care about. O'Flaherty and his colleagues decide that all they can do is rescue and protect; they cannot undertake or even aid anti-German activities like espionage or sabotage. A fellow priest who does become involved in these activities is captured and executed. Kappler genuinely loves his family, and loves Rome. His sense of honor is clear in the sacrifice he makes to protect O'Flaherty. He is brutal only in capitulation to the orders of his superiors.

Meanwhile, the Pope preserves what politicians call "deniability" by not permitting himself to know much about what O'Flaherty is doing. Though he warns that he will not be able to protect him when the Germans come, the Pope refuses to turn him over to them. The British emissary says that he cannot help, even though the men are his own soldiers, explaining that "My strictest duty is to do nothing which might compromise the neutrality of the Vatican State or His Holiness the Pope." His aide, however, is one of the most important participants in O'Flaherty's efforts. This is an outstanding story of true personal moral courage and redemption, with a conclusion that is deeply moving.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about whether O'Flaherty and Kappler are alike in certain ways. And if so, how? Why wouldn't O'Flaherty do more to fight the Germans? Why did O'Flaherty help Kappler's family? Were you surprised by the ending?

Movie details

For kids who love dramas

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