The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill Movie Poster Image
Fall in love with these brave and beautiful birds.
  • G
  • 2005
  • 83 minutes

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Stresses a love for all creatures and shows how adaptable animals are.

Violence & Scariness

Sad deaths (offscreen).

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the movie has some very sad moments including the death of some of the birds and a sad parting.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byswb April 9, 2008

Great for Nature Lovers!

My son is a bird lover and now wants to own this movie. It is a sweet, gentle movie and gives you insight into how birds can all have unique personalities. I t... Continue reading
Parent Written byjeb522 April 9, 2008

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

Telegraph Hill, overlooking the North Beach section of San Francisco, is a place where all kinds of creatures from all kinds of places can feel welcome. One of them is onetime musician Mark Bittner, a man with "no visible means of support" who is himself the support for some of the neighborhood's most colorful residents -- a flock of bright green wild parrots. THE WILD PARROTS OF TELEGRAPH HILL documents Bittner's one-of-a-kind mission.

Is it any good?

Through Bittner, even the least animal-friendly viewer will begin to fall in love with these brave and beautiful birds. His passion, dedication, and understanding are first impressive, then touching, then transcendent as he begins to talk about the death of a beloved parrot named Tupelo and tells a story from a zen master about the way we are all connected.

Bittner is in one respect a sort of St. Francis of Telegraph Hill, carting huge bags of birdseed home on the bus to feed to the parrots and taking the sick ones into his home to nurse them. But he is also their Jane Goodall, possibly the only person in history to study a group of parrots so intently over so long a period. Bittner doesn't have a job, at least not one that pays him anything. He lives rent-free in a crumbling cottage and gets free pastries from a local cafe. The birds are his full-time job. He studies them, reads up on them, consults the bird specialist at the local zoo, and develops his own treatments, even grooming one parrot when he no longer has a mate to do it for him. The movie concludes with a moment of breathtaking perfection with the sweetest connection of all.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how Bittner decided what was important to him and the steps he took to help him deal with change and loss in his life.

Movie details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate