VeggieTales: Dave and the Giant Pickle

Movie review by
Barbara Shulgas..., Common Sense Media
VeggieTales: Dave and the Giant Pickle Movie Poster Image
Biblical tale shows small people can do big things.
  • NR
  • 2004
  • 27 minutes

Parents say

age 5+
Based on 1 review

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

You don't have to be big, tall, or grown-up to do important things.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Dave is the youngest, smallest brother in Israel, but even though he's small, he's brave enough to take on the giant enemy none of his older and bigger brothers will fight. According to the VeggieTales credo, you can do anything God wants you to do, no matter how small you are. 

Violence & Scariness

The biblical Goliath, depicted here as a Philistine giant pickle, is knocked down, or "smote," as the story goes, by the slingshot of tiny Dave, who is destined one day to become the Israelite King David. 

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Part of the VeggieTales franchise.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that VeggieTales: Dave and the Giant Pickle adheres to all the tenets of solid storytelling, clever dialogue, and character development typical of this high-quality animated franchise. In this retelling of the David and Goliath biblical story, children are encouraged to see themselves as valuable people even though they may be young and small, as David was when he killed the Philistine warrior, according to biblical texts. As with all VeggieTales installments, the episode ends with a biblical quote and a reminder that the writers and producers believe that God loves us all and has made all of us special. 

User Reviews

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What's the story?

Young Dave, the diminutive Israelite shepherd, is the youngest of many brothers. As his people go to war with the invading Philistines, none of the soldiers is willing to fight mighty Goliath who, in this case, is a giant pickle. (Dave seems to be a baby asparagus.) Imbued with the love of God and the confidence it inspires, he volunteers to King Saul to fight Goliath. Wielding a slingshot, he bonks the big pickle in the noggin with a stone, and the rest is history. The story follows the well-known biblical tale closely but omits the detail about David cutting off the giant’s head to prove his death.   

Is it any good?

Writer-director-actor Phil Vischer brings his unflagging good taste and effervescent humor and humanity to this VeggieTales story. The dialogue is snappy, reflecting an interest in and a sense of fun about language. The voices are spot-on, and the tone, without condescension, is just right for children and, without pandering, for adults, too. This is one of the rare movies parents can enjoyably watch along with their small kids. Families who are on board with the Christian, biblical, God-centric message will find plenty for their kids to discuss and enjoy.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how much they value their youngest members, no matter how small. What are some things that kids can do better than adults?

  • Sometimes children can be unafraid to do things that grown-ups fear. What are some things grown-ups might be afraid of?

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  • What are some things kids are afraid of? Why might being afraid of something be a good thing? Can fear help keep us safe sometimes?

Movie details

For kids who love preschool tales

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