What She Wants for Christmas

Movie review by
Grace Montgomery, Common Sense Media
What She Wants for Christmas Movie Poster Image
Silly holiday flick has some adult relationship talk.
  • NR
  • 2012
  • 90 minutes

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

If you work hard, you'll get what you need.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Abigail's mom works extremely hard to provide a stable, loving home for her daughter.

Violence & Scariness

Some light slapstick bumbling.

Sexy Stuff

Talk of adult relationships, including divorce.

Language
Consumerism

A Suzuki commercial and car, multiple references to YouTube.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that What She Wants for Christmas is a mostly light and fairly fun Christmas flick that features an almost all-African American cast. There are some light slapstick falls and fumbles and some bad behavior on the kids' part. There is some adult talk about relationships (the mom and dad discuss why they ended up getting a divorce) and a few obvious product placements (multiple references to Suzuki and YouTube).

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written byKrekker December 25, 2015

Worst movie I've seen in a while

If I could rate this movie with "0 stars" I would have. Firstly, I was completely frustrated by the bratty, spoiled, sassy and lippy protagonist of th... Continue reading
Adult Written bydesir December 4, 2015

Topic of divorce and deadbeat dad

If your child is in a situation where a parent is not in Their life, they may not want to watch this movie. An awkward scene with an adult conversation with the... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

In a secret letter to Santa, Abigail (Brianna Dufrene) reveals the gift she secretly has been hoping for all year. Not convinced Santa will deliver, Abigail waits until her mom (Denise Boutte) goes to sleep, then waits in ambush for the man in red. Unbeknownst to her, Abigail's father (Christian Keyes), who's been absent for the last five years, has secretly snuck into the house dressed as Santa along with his elf-costumed assistant (Jackie Long) to make sure she has a magical Christmas. While Abigail holds Santa hostage, her father's assistant tries to determine what she really wants for Christmas, while neighbor Moosie (Lily Solange Hewitt) tries to enact her own plan to rescue Santa so she gets her presents delivered this year.

Is it any good?

WHAT SHE WANTS FOR CHRISTMAS has a really cute concept and some adorable details. And it's refreshing to see a kids' Christmas movie that doesn't have all white characters. But unfortunately, once you get past the first half, the flick starts to fall a little flat. The relationship between the parents is mostly kind of sad, and the discussion of why the dad hasn't been around for the last five years feels a little too adult and depressing for an otherwise silly movie. And Abigail, who claims she's been perfectly good all year, seems a bit too conniving and bossy to be believable.

But kids no doubt will love Abigail's elaborate schemes for getting what she wants for Christmas. And there are some really great messages about the importance of working hard to get what you want. It's some moderately good Christmas fun but probably not a film you'll watch again next year.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what makes Christmas special. Is it getting the gift you really want? Or spending time with your family? What holiday traditions are special to your family?

  • What do you really want for Christmas? What gifts are you excited to give?

  • What's your favorite Christmas movie? Why is it your favorite?

Movie details

For kids who love the holidays

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