Wings: Sky Force Heroes

Movie review by
Barbara Shulgas..., Common Sense Media
Wings: Sky Force Heroes Movie Poster Image
Dull sequel has more scares, peril than the original.
  • PG
  • 2014
  • 82 minutes

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Meant to entertain rather than educate.

Positive Messages

Stand by your friends.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Ace puts aside personal safety to rescue friends and fellow employees. Sidekick Fred urges Ace to waste no more time at the coal mine and go back to rescuing.

Violence & Scariness

Ace's rescue boss doesn't make it back from a fiery rescue mission. Ace and fellow transport aircraft nearly crash when they carry double loads to meet the mine boss's unreasonable quotas. They plummet down a canyon but are rescued in the end. Robots bang around but don't get seriously injured. One plane appears to fall to his demise but later reappears uninjured. A disrespectful boss throws a book at Ace's face. A heavy snowstorm grounds the crew, and an avalanche forces them to hide in a mine where they shiver in the cold waiting to be saved. Ace overcomes his fear and flies through a burning hangar.

Sexy Stuff
Language

"Meathead," "poopyhead," and "dweeb."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this 2014 animated comedy sequel to Wings depicts planes and robots rescuing their pals from fire and an avalanche. One plane appears to fall to his demise but later reappears uninjured. A disrespectful boss throws a book at Ace's face. Young children may find some of the peril and fast-flying sequences scary. When angry, characters call each other "meathead," "poopyhead," and "dweeb."

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What's the story?

In the world of WINGS: SKY FORCE HEROES where planes, trucks, and robots talk, Ace (Josh Duhamel), Windy (Hilary Duff), Fred, and the Colonel work as airborne rescuers. Ace defies orders during a mission and the Colonel dies. Ace blames himself and quits the rescue squad for a job transporting coal, but when his fellow mine workers face an avalanche, Ace jumps back into rescue mode.

Is it any good?

This movie is as dull and unsatisfying as the previous Wings film but with a few more scary sequences. Add confusion to the ways in which this film fails. Plot lines are vague and unclear. The finale hangs on a snowstorm rescue, but why do the planes need rescue? Unclear. Most of the characters have the same names and voices as those in the previous movie. Josh Duhamel still plays a plane called Ace, and Hilary Duff plays one called Windy. But the characters are completely different in looks and history. The sleek aerobatics jet called Ace is now a chunky propeller-driven rescue plane. Windy was a lean lavender aerobics instructor; now she's a pink double-propeller rescuer. Rob Schneider voiced a sidekick bird called Dodo; now he is a robot named Fred. Why bother calling this Wings?

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the importance of loyalty and teamwork. What are some examples of these qualities in the movie?

  • Why do you think it's important to face your fears? What are you afraid of? What can you do to overcome this fear?

  • Sometimes it's important to follow the rules, and sometimes it takes courage to break the rules. How can you decide whether you should follow the rules or your heart?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love cartoons

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