30 Minute Meals

 
(i)

 

Ubiquitous Ray teaches basics. OK for young chefs.

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Ray enjoys what she does -- teaching about preparing and cooking food for others. She frequently speaks nicely about her friends, family, husband, and dog.

Violence & scariness
Not applicable
Sexy stuff

Very mild innuendo. Ray occasionally talks about a meal being great for date night.

Language

Nothing to worry about. The worst are phrases like "if you screw up" and "my mom will kill me."

Consumerism

Ray is everywhere, and she's becoming a brand to rival Martha Stewart -- cooking supplies, cookbooks, magazines, boxes of crackers, more TV shows.

Drinking, drugs, & smoking

Ray will recommend wines to drink with meals. She's sometimes seen drinking while she eats her cooked meal at the end of the show.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that although this foodie show is targeted at adults, kids who like to cook will pick up some basic instruction and exposure to different foods. Because the show is about preparing, cooking, and serving a meal within a short time span, the meals are relatively simple and easy (another kid-appeal factor). Perky hostess Rachael Ray is swiftly developing a brand awareness to rival Martha Stewart's; once they're familiar with Ray, your kids will see her everywhere -- cookbooks, magazines, even on the back of a box of crackers. She's very lively, chatting with viewers (sometimes about preparing a great "date night" meal or how to get through to the person you love through the kitchen) but not always touching on the health aspects of meal preparation.

Kids say

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What's the story?

With 30 MINUTE MEALS, the now-famous Rachael Ray proved herself to be the Martha Stewart for busy adults who want good food but have little time or energy to cook. Her spin is to take traditional dishes and re-invent them, which can be a hit-or-miss concept for kids. Her tendency to act like a big kid in the kitchen -- with lots of exclamations of \"yum-o\" or \"this is awesome!\" -- has made her popular among school-aged kids interested in cooking. She likes working with kids and occasionally includes them in the show.

Is it any good?

QUALITY
 

Although Ray sometimes says things like "And if you screw up..." or "Make this on date night and watch out," overall her vocabulary is relatively tame. Her energy level is contagious to kids, and her basic instructions may encourage younger viewers to want to help in the kitchen and/or eat more adventuresome meals.

She's been called a "bobble head" by famed chef and critic Anthony Bourdain, and Ray's perky style of performing while teaching cooking is a big turn-off to many. She also has her own vocabulary, which kids may need translated: "EVOO" (extra virgin olive oil), "figure-friendly food," "sammy" (sandwich), "stoup" (soup/stew), and others. But while Ray may be annoyingly perky and too conspicuous as a brand to win skeptical parents over, she clearly enjoys what she does and may give kids some fun insight into cooking. And who knows? You might get a home-cooked meal to boot.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about different meal ingredients and their origins throughout the world. Which ones are healthy? Which should you avoid? Parents should also address kitchen safety -- using sharp instruments, cooking on a stove top, using an oven, etc. If kids are interested in cooking, this is a great opportunity to whip something up together from start (meal planning) to finish (chowing down).

TV details

Cast:Rachael Ray
Network:Food Network
Genre:Educational
TV rating:TV-G

This review of 30 Minute Meals was written by

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Quality

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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What parents and kids say

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Adult Written byA5 April 9, 2008
 
Written byAnonymous December 7, 2012
 

She's making food.

This Show is Good to see.
What other families should know
Great messages
Kid, 12 years old April 9, 2008
 

dadadad scary itaian woman

ahh this stinks

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