A Little Curious

TV review by
Larisa Wiseman, Common Sense Media
A Little Curious TV Poster Image
Quirky animated objects teach but don't engage.

Parents say

age 3+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 2+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Helps young preschoolers learn basic concepts like "up and down."

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this series does a decent job of teaching important concepts and exploring their various meanings through humor, song, and entertaining visuals. The series is probably best suited for the youngest of preschoolers, as older ones may find it a bit bland; the lessons are very basic, and the animated characters are far from being the most engaging or endearing you'd find on television (at least from an adult point of view).

User Reviews

Parent of a 3, 13, and 15 year old Written byDado3 October 19, 2009

Perfect for babies, toddlers, and preschool

I have three children, now ages 3, 13, and 16. This show originally aired in 1998 on HBO family for ONE season(1998-1999). But, has been re-broadcasting those... Continue reading
Parent of a 1, 3, 4, 4, 7, and 8 year old Written byKelsyKin October 29, 2010
My son who has Autism loves this. He will beg for this show. Shame it is only on HBO, since we no longer have HBO we no longer can watch.
Teen, 14 years old Written byDAz mongoose October 15, 2015

:)

I liked this when i was little.
Teen, 14 years old Written byAlittleCuriousFan90s January 11, 2018

A Little Curious (My Fave TV Show)

Plush wears a midriff all the time. But in The Froller Show, Plush wears all midriff. Plush uses cigarettes.

What's the story?

A LITTLE CURIOUS, HBO Family's animated series for preschoolers, takes a group of everyday objects and brings them to life, giving each one a distinct and quirky personality. Each episode features some or all of these characters in a collection of vignettes revolving around easily digested concepts or themes -- such as \"up and down,\" \"soft,\" \"slippery,\" and so on. Some of the central characters in the series include Bob, a friendly looking red ball whose exuberance and curiosity betray his young age; Doris, a door (yes, like your house's front door) who brings to mind a middle-aged, boisterous aunt; Little Cup, an innocent, toddler-age cup who's Bob's sidekick; Mop, an edgy cleaning tool who likes rock music; and fussy Mr. String, who twists and ties himself into various shapes. The vignettes are very short, just a minute or two each, and include fun, original songs tailored to the theme of the day, and the animation is an eye-catching mix of traditional 2-D cel animation, 3-D computer-generated animation, and, occasionally, claymation and photography.

Is it any good?

Although it's hard to get warm fuzzies from watching talking household objects than from watching charming, furry puppets or cute animated animals, the concepts this series teaches are certainly valuable. They contribute to preschoolers' vocabulary and make them aware of the world around them. The familiarity of these everyday objects also helps viewers relate them to their own surroundings.

Still, the characters in A Little Curious just aren't as charming or engaging as many of the favorites you'd find on the Disney Channel or Noggin, for example. Kids get more engaged in what they're learning onscreen when they develop a soft spot for an adorable character or are made to feel like they're part of the action, and this show keeps viewers at arm's length because the characters are a bit more impersonal.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about each episode and its themes. Was there a particular character that was featured in this episode? Which words or phrases were featured in the episode? Did you learn about words or phrases that have several different meanings, and what were they? Did any of the characters sing? Who sang the songs, and what were they about? What are some other things you learned? What did you like most about the episode?

TV details

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