Adam Devine's House Party

TV review by
Jenny Nixon, Common Sense Media
Adam Devine's House Party TV Poster Image
Raunchy stand-up showcase is a mixed bag of laughs.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Devine's shenanigans aren't to be emulated; while the comedians showcased are funny, they generally don't send the best messages. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Devine is a goofy guy who's trying to keep things on the up-and-up, but he and his cohorts are not great role models. 

Violence

Slapstick violence played for laughs: The host shoots a gun he thinks is fake (but turns out to be real); wrestling; hand-to-hand struggles.

Sex

Simulated masturbation, characters shown "sexting," lots of pickup-artist-type talk.

Language

Many and varied swears, including "f--k," "d--k," "s--t."

Consumerism

A few brands of alcohol are consumed.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Pretty much everyone is wasted; alcohol obviously plays a large part in maintaining the house-party vibe.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Adam Devine's House Party is a throwback to the Def Comedy Jam-style stand-up shows of the '80s and '90s -- and, with a variety of comedians featured each week, viewers are exposed to an array of subjects ranging from quirky yet "clean" to darker, more profane, and potentially disturbing. Between comics, short sketches star Devine and his cohorts. The show's atmosphere abounds with excessive drinking, smoking, drug and sex references, and no shortage of four-letter words ... much like a real house party.

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What's the story?

ADAM DEVINE'S HOUSE PARTY has a simple premise: Comedy Central has given the actor (one of the goofball stars of their hit comedy Workaholics, playing himself) some cash to start up his own stand-up comedy show. He, being an irrepressible party dog, blows the money on a New Orleans mansion and a huge party for all his pals. (Of course, many of those pals seem to be stand-up comedians who coincidentally have sets prepared on the spot.) The stand-up is interspersed with Devine's misadventures as he navigates his own out-of-control party.

Is it any good?

As with any comedy showcase, the quality is only as good as the performers, so your laugh mileage may vary from episode to episode. The show does a good job of balancing comedy up-and-comers such as Rell Battle and Sabrena Jalees with more high-profile funny folk such as Kristen Schaal (Flight of the Conchords, The Last Man on Earth) and Kurt Braunholder (Bob's Burgers).

Devine's persona as host is a far cry from the sweet-natured "manny" (male nanny) the actor plays on Modern Family but should be appreciated by fans of Workaholics who need a fix between seasons, especially since the show features occasional cameos from his costars. Scripted bits featuring Devine and the week's featured comics (plus a host of extras) are interspersed between the stand-up sets and succeed largely thanks to Devine's charmingly obnoxious vibe. Story lines feature gags about "dick pics," masturbation, kidnapping, and murder (but the violence is slapstick and played for laughs). The comedy sets feature a lot of relationship and dating humor, so there's not a lot here for kids to relate to, though it probably won't stop them from trying.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Is there any subject matter that is off-limits for joking about? Why, or why not?

  •  

  • What kinds of consequences are there in the real world when it comes to drinking and smoking to excess?

TV details

For kids who love comedy

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