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All Rise

TV review by
Marty Brown, Common Sense Media
All Rise TV Poster Image
Earnest courtroom melodrama has good intentions, violence.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Messages have to do with the justice system and how the law should be applied fairly to everyone.

Positive Role Models & Representations

An incredibly diverse cast. The show avoids stereotypes but doesn't always acknowledge cultural difference in its characters.

Violence

The show takes place within the criminal justice system and features a range of violent acts and crimes in each episode, including shootings, unhinged people, and attacks.

Sex

The show features romantic relationships and may sometimes include crimes of a sexual nature.

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Characters drink socially. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that All Rise is a courtroom drama about a newly promoted judge. The progressive Judge Lola Carmichael (Simone Missick) is willing to bend protocol to ensure that justice is administered fairly, and she's assisted by other characters who work in the court building, including lawyers, clerks, and senior officials. Each week features new cases, so there's a wide range of crimes featured on the show, some played for comedy, others more serious and containing violent acts.

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What's the story?

In ALL RISE, Deputy District Attorney Lola Carmichael (Simone Missick) gets appointed to a judgeship and immediately has to navigate through the bureaucracy and politics of the justice system in order to ensure that the law is applied equally and fairly to everyone that enters her courtroom. The show features new cases each week and follows a variety of characters throughout the courthouse, including lawyers, clerks, security guards, and others.

Is it any good?

While certainly well-intentioned, this series consistently undermines and trivializes its messages of social equality by using hot-button issues in melodramatic ways. In the first episode of All Rise, for example, a courtroom is held hostage by a bigoted man having a breakdown, but other characters don't seem to be upset by it at all, making the event feel manufactured and exploitative. Additionally, the main character, Judge Carmichael, is presented as a flawless hero who breaks protocol (not to mention the law itself) to ensure that justice is applied fairly to those that enter her courtroom -- but assuming that a single person can always understand who's actually innocent and who is guilty is pretty much the opposite of what actually makes the court system work.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the American justice system. How does the trial system work? What are its positives and negatives? How do the characters in All Rise act on their beliefs about the justice system?

  • How does Judge Lola Carmichael view her responsibilities as a judge? What is her point of view? How does she express it through her work? What gets in the way of her ideals?

TV details

For kids who love courtroom TV

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