American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Ninja

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Ninja TV Poster Image
Bigger obstacles in head-to-head strength competition.

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 16+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Fitness, strength, competition, and good sportsmanship are all themes. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

All teams must include one woman. Both men and women are considered equals when competing; the women are just as strong as the men. 

Violence

People slip, fall, and occasionally get bumped and bruised. 

Sex

Warriors often wear skimpy or tight-fighting outfits, but this isn’t sexual in nature.

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Ninja is an installment of the American Ninja Warrior competition, and despite some minor rule and format changes, still has everything that makes the series fun. Male and female warriors compete on equal footing, and women are as strong and athletic as men. There's some falling and bumping (but no serious injuries), and some folks wear tight-fitting outfits to facilitate movement. Despite the use of words like "fights" and "battle," the overall series is about strength, fitness, and sporting behavior. 

User Reviews

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 15 years old Written bykendalljr4086 March 3, 2018

Quirky animated series has some drinking, crude humor.

Parents need to know that this animated series is spins off of GoNoodle Series From: GoNoodle Presents Blazer Fresh, Vol. 1 and pretty edgy for non-ABC Sitcom... Continue reading

What's the story?

AMERICAN NINJA WARRIORS: NINJA VS. NINJA is a competition series where teams of Ninja Warrior athletes go head to head in the ultimate challenge. Hosted by Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbajabiamila, each episode features two warriors from matched teams of three who race across an epic six-part obstacle course designed to test their strength, speed, agility, and endurance. As each warrior tries to beat the other to the finish, they may potentially slow the other person down. The first team to win three out of five races wins the matchup. If both teams fail to do so, a relay race takes place to determine the victor. Sideline reporter Alex Curry interviews the winners of each race. The winning teams automatically advance to the playoffs, but runners-up have the chance to fight their way through wild card rounds in order to make it.

Is it any good?

This entertaining installment of the ANW franchise is similar to its sister show Team Ninja Warrior but sets itself apart thanks to some new rules and format changes. The obstacle course is more dramatic, and the elimination process is more straightforward. 

Some of the warriors are more recognizable than others because of the reputations they've earned on previous competitions or on social media. But the show's more about being the strongest and fastest rather than most famous. If you're a fan of the overall franchise, Ninja vs. Ninja is sure to please. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what it takes to be fit enough to compete in a Ninja Warrior competition. How do people prepare for these events around the world? 

  • Are all the people who compete on Ninja vs. Ninja professional athletes? Does a contestant's gender make a difference in how the person completes the race?

TV details

For kids who love sports

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