Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown TV Poster Image
Award-winning travel, food show serves up strong language.

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age 8+
Based on 1 review

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The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Food is an important part of history and culture anywhere in the world. 

Violence

A country's violent history, conflicts discussed; violent archive footage shows shootings, fighting.

Sex

Some behaviors deemed sexist by Western standards are discussed, not judged. 

Language

"Bitch," "s--t" occasionally uttered. 

Consumerism

Local brands, restaurants. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Alcohol is consumed; occasional smoking; cocaine referenced.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the award-winning food and travel documentary series Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown serves up some interesting cuisine but also contains some strong language ("bitch," "s--t"). The tumultuous history of certain countries is discussed, and sometimes archived news footage of violent events is shown, but it's all offered in an educational context. Drinking alcohol is common, and occasionally smoking is visible. Local businesses and brands are sometimes shown, but the focus is really on the dishes being prepared.  

User Reviews

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Teen, 15 years old Written byMax Corbett April 16, 2017

I Learned A Lot

I think this show is pretty cool. I mean seriously people, I've travel shows before but this one has a person trying food in other countries. Very creative... Continue reading

What's the story?

ANTHONY BOURDAIN: PARTS UNKNOWN is a multiple Emmy Award-winning documentary series about food and culture in lesser known parts of the world. Chef and television foodie Anthony Bourdain travels around the world to places like Myanmar, Libya, and the Congo to learn more about their cultures and local cuisines. He also travels to more Western areas such as Quebec, Los Angeles, and Scotland to try local favorites from lesser-known neighborhood haunts. Celebs such as Iggy Pop and Bill Murray sometimes join the fun. During each adventure, Bourdain talks to chefs, historians, cinematographers, and others who offer interesting details about the history, politics, and culture of the area.

Is it any good?

This award-winning food and travel series combines cultural lessons and food-tasting experiences with journalistic style. Details about some of the political, economic, and social issues that have affected an area's evolution are discussed with the help of local residents as well as experts. Throughout it all, the role of food and its preparation are explored. 

The conversations about food are fun, especially when they contain uncommon ingredients or require specific ways of eating. However, the conversations about the cultures from which they come are as rich as the cuisine. The images of the food, as well as the daily practices and special moments of each community, are also spectacular. Even if you aren't a foodie, Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown offers an interesting and informative viewing experience. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what it's like to travel all over the world to try new foods like on Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. Are there foods that you would love to try? Food you'd be afraid to taste? 

  • What can food tell us about a country and its cultures? 

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