Apres Ski

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Apres Ski TV Poster Image
Start-up pampers VIPs post-ski in standard reality show.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Starting any business is hard; pleasing VIPs is harder.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Some cast members are more professional than others.

Violence

Lots of arguing; extreme sports.

Sex

Flirting, strong innuendo, partial nudity (bare buttocks).

Language

"Hell," "ass," "bitch." Endless bleeped cursing.

Consumerism

It's a promotional vehicle for Gibbons Life. Visible logos include GMC, Blackcomb Resorts.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Constant drinking (wine, cocktails, beer, champagne).

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Apres Ski is an unscripted Bravo series about a concierge service that exists to pamper the rich post-ski. It contains all the content one comes to expect from the genre, including endless arguing, lots of sexual innuendo and steamy hookups, copious amounts of drinking, and lots of flaunted wealth. There's some nudity (bare bottoms), too. Words such as "bitch," "hell," and "ass" are frequent, but curses are bleeped. Logos for GMC and various Whistler resorts visible.

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What's the story?

APRES SKI is a reality series that follows the staff of a start-up concierge service designed to give wealthy skiers the ultimate post-skiing experience. Joey Gibbons, the owner of Gibbons Life, along with his CEO Tamara Moore, has put together a top-notch team of hospitality experts from across North America that will give VIPs in Whistler, British Columbia, the experience of a lifetime. Under the ever-watchful eye of Operations Manager Elise Wims, concierges Jim Sced, Bobby Crowder, Kendra Larkin, and Lynsey Dyer plan over-the-top vacations for their rich clientele and meet their every whim when they arrive. Assisting them is Charlotte Fenton, the concierge assistant, who just happens to be best friends with Bobby. From scouting out exclusive mountaintop spa services and peak-to-peak gondola rides to taking clients dog-sledding, the group has one winter season to get this business off the ground by surpassing their clients' expectations. It isn't easy, especially when the drama among them is worse than that of their most unpleasant clientele.

Is it any good?

The voyeuristic and mildly entertaining series follows the typical Bravo reality format by featuring lots of contrived over-the-top moments designed for dramatic appeal. What stands out here, however, are some of the extraordinary outdoor activities featured, as well as the beautiful British Columbia mountain backdrop.

It has its share of cringeworthy moments, especially when things go wrong. Some of the attitudes of the affluent clientele are pretty obnoxious, too. If you like this kind of reality entertainment, you may find this one to be a worthy guilty pleasure.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the history of après–ski. Did you know the tradition began in the French Alps in the mid-1800s? Why is it considered an important part of ski culture today? Does this show offer a realistic look at what après–ski is really about?

  • Why do reality shows often feature risky behaviors such as excessive drinking and promiscuity? Is it entertaining? Is it OK if the show isn't meant for kids?

TV details

For kids who love outdoor reality

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