At Home with Amy Sedaris

TV review by
Jenny Nixon, Common Sense Media
At Home with Amy Sedaris TV Poster Image
Twisted satire of craft and cooking shows isn't for kids.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The show is too ridiculous to impart any real messages.

Positive Role Models & Representations

While the characters she plays are generally absurd and very, very weird, Sedaris is always chipper and optimistic. 

Violence

Dark jokes about poisoning and stabbing people, cartoonishly brutal craft accidents (a woman is impaled in the head with a pair of scissors thanks to her craft-room clumsiness).

Sex

Lots of cheesy innuendo, some sleazy characters making raunchy jokes. Amy ends up in bed with a few of her guests.

Language

"Bastard," "hell," "bitch," "damn."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking is frequently mentioned -- there's even a roving wine expert character, "Wine Lady," who drops in occasionally to advise Amy on the best booze to serve at her dinner parties. Some drug references.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that At Home with Amy Sedaris is an absurdist comedy disguised as a homemaking/crafting show, and the bizarre, often suggestive humor may not be appropriate for younger viewers. There are references to sexual fetishes, some off-color jokes about sex, drugs, and religion, and alcohol is frequently mentioned. Violence is alluded to and in some cases shown, although it's cartoonish (think: slapstick craft accidents and killer plastic snakes). The show's hilarious -- but satirical and twisted -- humor is definitely intended for more mature audiences.

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What's the story?

AT HOME WITH AMY SEDARIS is a kooky and colorful send-up of retro homemaking shows of the 1960s and '70s, injected with the bizarre and outrageous humor the show's co-creators Amy Sedaris and Paul Dinello (Strangers with Candy) have become known for. As the titular hostess with the mostest, Amy invites viewers into her cartoonishly appointed home and instructs them on a variety of cooking and crafting techniques, encouraging her fans to "accentuate the positives and medicate the negatives." Shows have nebulous and often weird topics like "Poverty," "Cooking for One," and "Fish." Guest stars drop by, sometimes in character (Nick Kroll's lecherous "Randy Fingerling" helps the creeped-out Sedaris assemble an ice cream cake) and sometimes as themselves (The Late Show's Stephen Colbert is outed as Amy's go-to turtle-sitter). Each episode wraps up with our host writing in her "Party Log," reflecting on what did and didn't work. (Pro tip: Snakes and crafts don't mix.)

Is it any good?

If the picture-perfect crafts and cooking on most homemaking shows drive you batty, and you can tolerate risqué jokes and whimsical weirdness, you'll likely enjoy this delirious and demented comedy. Each episode is broken into fun segments -- you won't want to miss Amy's "Crafting Corner," where she goes nuts with fake fingernails, gallons of glue, and bags of hair -- that keep the pace lively and the laughs coming. The humor in At Home with Amy Sedaris can be dark, for sure (a man with a mobile knife-sharpening biz advises Amy that "knives are patient ... unless provoked"), but if you're a fan of Sedaris' singularly oddball schtick, you'll probably love it.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the off-kilter brand of comedy featured in At Home with Amy Sedaris. In what ways does the show satirize a typical cooking/lifestyle show? Would (or should?!) you use any of Amy's tips in real life?

  • Amy Sedaris not only hosts the show, she also plays a variety of wacky characters on it and is often disguised under heavy makeup and wigs. What's fun about dressing up, even for adults? 

TV details

For kids who love silly comedy

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