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Baby Jake

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Baby Jake TV Poster Image
Charming British show's unusual style is an acquired taste.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

The show intends to entertain rather than to educate.

Positive Messages

Kids see Baby Jake enjoy trying new things and meeting new friends. Scenes that show the hustle and bustle of Jake's home emphasize the feelings of joy and belonging among family members. The show's animation style is creative and unique.

 

Positive Role Models & Representations
Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Baby Jake follows the magical adventures of a baby whose image appears as a photographic head on an animated body and whose thoughts and words are provided by his older brother's voice. The visual effect of Jake's hybrid appearance is unusual, but the series is charming in its simplicity and in how it presents Jake's joyful reactions to new experiences. Viewers see Jake visit a farm, meet jungle animals, and play games with his animated friends who join in his adventures. The show also reminds viewers of the special bond that exists between siblings as Jake's brother interprets his thoughts and feelings for the audience.

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What's the story?

BABY JAKE is a British series in which 9-month-old Jake (Adamo Bertacchi-Morroni) enjoys magical adventures that are narrated by his older brother, Isaac (Franco Bertacchi-Morroni, voiced by Kaizer Akhtar). Episodes open spanning the activity in the bustling windmill home of Jake, his parents, and his nine older siblings. The focus shifts to Jake and Isaac, and their adventure takes off as they look out the window and the scenery changes to suit the story's setting. Jake appears as a moving photographic face on an animated body, and along with his magical friends sets about exploring his new surroundings with the help of Isaac's voice.

Is it any good?

The unusual and sometimes jerky animation style of this preschool series takes some getting used to. It's a bit like a gif that goes on and on (and on), following a giggling and babbling Jake as he visits outer space, goes on a picnic, plays in the snow, and so on. As he smiles and gurgles, Isaac's voice translates Jake's thoughts for viewers and fills in the dialogue while he plays with his friends, lending a certain authenticity in its seeming unscripted nature and joyful interplay between siblings.

Baby Jake is a unique and occasionally charming series, but its unique style likely won't be a hit with every viewer. Those who like it enough to watch will find positive messages that suggest that trying new things and having new experiences can be a lot of fun. The show also reminds kids of the special bond that exists among siblings.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about this show's unique animation style. Does it suit the show's stories, or is the combination distracting as you watch? Do you think a similar style would work for other shows as well?

  • What makes Jake's connection with Isaac special? Are your kids close with their siblings? What do they enjoy doing together?

  • Kids: How does Jake demonstrate an adventurous spirit? How do new experiences help us learn about ourselves and the world around us? Does it take courage to try new things?

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For kids who love preschool fun

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