Billy the Exterminator

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Billy the Exterminator TV Poster Image
Pest-control reality show is surprisingly animal friendly.

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 4 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

When possible, animals are rescued and relocated. Billy also promotes the use of more human-friendly methods for pest removal. There's some drama among the family members/co-workers.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Billy is gentle, knowledgeable, and animal-friendly and spends time explaining the role of animals in the ecosystem as well as the potential harm they can pose. There's some cattiness between Donnie and ex-daughter-in-law Pam.

Violence

Billy and the Vexcon company try to avoid killing animals when possible, but it's sometimes necessary (the company's logo is a skull and crossbones). Snakes, alligators, and angry raccoons violently resist removal. Billy sometimes uses scary gothic masks when he's removing bees and other critters, but his additional attire (like feather boas) makes it more funny than frightening.

Sex
Language

Audible language includes occasional use of words like "hell." Rare swear words like "s--t" are sometimes said during heated arguments, but they're fully bleeped.

Consumerism

The series is a promotional vehicle for the Vexcon Company. Some of Billy's non-traditional techniques require the use of food products like Oberto beef jerky, while mice and roaches enjoy products like Jell-O. DeWalt tools are visible. Billy drives a Dodge truck.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that atlhough the family at the center of this reality series about a Louisiana pest control business has a Goth-like persona (the company logo is a skull and crossbones), the show is fairly mild -- and animal friendly -- overall. That said, the series does include some family drama, which leads to a few catty arguments and occasional "bleeped out" swearing (like "s--t"). Food and tool product logos are sometimes visible, and some of the pests being removed (which range from cockroaches to alligators) resist rather violently.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byJEDI micah November 18, 2012

He's got Louisiana's back!

There's no pest that Billy cannot defeat! He always seems to come up ways to get rid of them. That's one reason why I like this show. The second reaso... Continue reading
Adult Written byTimTheTVGuy November 19, 2012

Epic.

Awesomeness.That's it.I love animals and all,but Billy the Exterminator is awesome.Best show on A&E,because it is really cool.
Kid, 12 years old June 26, 2012

Billy the Exterminatorrrrr

This is a great show, although sometimes language can slip. This show is not for the squeamish but it's great if you have a boy who loves animals such as c... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byfabianjfbrouwer May 4, 2017

dont watch it

i think this tv show is terrible and should be shut down. animals should be able to do what they want without this guy take them away from their familys and hom... Continue reading

What's the story?

BILLY THE EXTERMINATOR follows former U.S. Air Force Sergeant Billy Bretherton and other members of the Bretherton-owned Vexcon Company as they help people with their pest-control problems. Viewers watch as Billy, sometimes assisted by his brother Rick and other employees, employs both standard techniques and non-traditional methods to remove vicious raccoons from petting zoos, buzzing bee hives from inside walls, mice-eating snakes from abandoned homes, and renegade alligators from suburban streets. Unlike other exterminators, the animal-loving Billy and his family go the extra mile, attempting to rescue as many animals as possible and relocating them to more eco-friendly locations. Meanwhile, Billy's home life has its own share of drama as his family -- including wife Mary, dad \"Big Bill,\" and spirited mom Donnie -- come to terms with the reappearance of Rick's ex-wife, Pat, and her efforts to play a role in the business.

Is it any good?

Despite Vexcon's skull and crossbones logo and some of the family's dark Gothic attire, BIlly the Exterminator is surprisingly gentle. Billy seems to love his work, and his love for animals is apparent with every job he does. He also offers interesting bits of information about specific animals' role in the ecosystem. There are funny moments, too, particularly when Billy employs his own special methods -- including wearing black leather outfits with scary masks and feather boas -- to keep from being bitten and/or stung by the animals he's working with.

While watching Billy and his crew work with wild animals ends up being fairly kid-safe entertainment overall, the show's focus on the tense relationship between Rick's ex-wife and the rest of the family creates some uncomfortable (and arguably unnecessary voyeuristic) scenes. Donnie's outspoken ways also lead to some catty moments, and family discussions sometimes get a bit heated. But if you can overlook that side of things, this series actually offers some lighthearted, informative entertainment for those who enjoy watching people doing jobs that they probably wouldn't want to do themselves.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the way that people who work in fields that many viewers wouldn't be comfortable with are portrayed in the media. What makes them interesting subject matter for reality television?

  • Do you think shows like this are meant to help viewers appreciate the work and risks that go into "unusual" jobs? Or are they primarily intended to just entertain?

  • How do people get started in these careers? What kinds of skills (and personality) does someone need to be able to do pest control work?

TV details

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