Cardcaptor Sakura

TV review by
Lien Murakami, Common Sense Media
Cardcaptor Sakura TV Poster Image
Cute action-packed magical girl anime with romance.

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 9 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

Intended to entertain, not educate.

Positive Messages

The main characters work to keep the world safe and fight on the side of the "good guys." Themes of friendship, family, and doing the right thing run throughout.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Sakura is a kind, brave, and responsible girl who helps her family with chores when she's not out collecting Clow Cards.

Violence & Scariness

Lots of bloodless fantasy violence. The Clow Cards, before they are captured, manifest themselves as malevolent spirits that wreak havoc. However, Sakura and her rival cardcaptor, Li Shaoran almost always win and are rarely hurt. Toya receives the most injuries as Sakura has the habit of stepping on his foot or kicking his shin when he embarrasses or teases her.

Sexy Stuff

Multiple crushes, some which border on obsession. Same-sex crushes and relationships are removed in the American dub. Sakura and her female elementary school classmates wear extremely short uniform skirts. Other female outfits are sometimes form-fitting.

Language

There is some teasing between siblings. Some name calling such as "monster" and "brute."

Consumerism

Lots of Cardcaptor Sakura merchandise is available.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Cardcaptor Sakura is available in both subtitled, uncut (and more mature) versions, as well as dubbed, edited versions more appropriate for tweens. Parents might want to determine which version they have access to before giving the OK to younger kids (we recommend the dubbed version for kids 8 and older). Much of the romance as well as same-sex relationships and crushes are cut out of the American dub. The series does have a lot of action but it is completely bloodless and no more violent than your average Pokemon movie. As is common for anime, the skirts on the school uniforms for girls are extremely short, however, to its credit Sakura generally looks and behaves much like a mature 10-year-old girl would.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bybree89 October 27, 2012

Great series

Cardcaptor Sakura is a wonderful series that's perfect for girls. Boys can watch too of course lol. The characters are likeable and the storyline is great.... Continue reading
Adult Written byAmber1997 April 10, 2016
Kid, 11 years old December 21, 2014

A mystic adventure.

I simply love this series. Apart from Rozen Maiden, it'd have to be my favourite anime. Some people are complaining about the length of the uniform skirts.... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old August 21, 2012

anime anime MANGA MANGA ANIME ANIME manga manga

i love this anime and it is one off the anime for kids. if ur small i iwll give u animes for kids like k-on, shugo chara, and squid girl.

What's the story?

Ten-year-old Sakura (voiced by Sakura Tange) is a fourth grader who lives with her widowed archeology professor father and teenaged brother. One day after school, Sakura accidentally unleashes a collection of magical "Clow Cards" from a locked book she finds in her father's office. Keroberos (Aya Hisakawa, called Cerberus in the English version), the guardian beast of the seal on the book appears and informs Sakura that she must have some magical powers within her or else she would not have been able to open the book. He also argues that since she loosed the magical Clow Cards, Sakura is now responsible for retrieving the lost cards to prevent an unspecified world-wide catastrophe. Each Clow Card has the ability to manifest as a malevolent spirit that could wreak havoc unless they are sealed away in a card where they can be used as needed. Keroberos gives Sakura a magical key and guides her in her task to collect and seal all of the Clow Cards.

Is it any good?

CARDCAPTOR SAKURA (not to be confused with the American dub Cardcaptors) is a classic of the magical girl sub-genre of anime and shojo manga (manga written for girls). Part of the appeal of the show is the artwork (although, one has to question some of the outfits poor Sakura is forced to wear) and adorable characters. For example, Keroberos, whose true form is a huge winged lion, spends most of the series as a cute stuffed animal sidekick with a sweet tooth. Sakura herself is an incredibly likeable girl who is thoughtful, romantic, athletic, modest, and brave. She reluctantly takes on the role of cardcaptor and is initially fearful of the dangers but she almost always pushes through her fears to do what's needed.

Cardcaptor Sakura relies on a lot of anime and magical girl conventions, but it's unique in that it is generally well written and much of Sakura's situations are grounded in her reality. The solutions Sakura comes up with for defeating certain Clow Cards are things that any kid could think of given enough time. Finally, there is a lightness to the dialogue as the characters tease and joke with one another. The relationship between Sakura and her brother Toya is believable. The series, as a whole, has a nice balance of action, humor, good characters, and design and is well worth seeking out.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about crushes and obsessions. Sakura has a school girl crush on her teacher and her older brother's best friend. How are her crushes similar or different to those in real life where tweens obsess about singers or other popular figures?

  • Why are Sakura's skirts so short? Girls: How would wearing a skirt that short make you feel? What kind of attention would you get? What other anime conventions do you notice?

  • Sakura loves to roller blade. What are some of your favorite outdoor activities and sports? How can kids to find a balance between their indoor and outdoor lives?

TV details

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