Cold as Balls

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Cold as Balls TV Poster Image
Funny interview banter sometimes goes overboard.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Discussions about sports, athletes' personal lives, racial makeup, underwear preferences, etc., some of which make the athletes a little uncomfortable. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Kevin Hart tries to make his guests uncomfortable by teasing, telling jokes at their expense, including the occasional sexist and racially motivated quip.

Violence

Questions about kicking people in the genitals during games, etc. Part of the shtick includes Hart getting aggressive with locker room attendants. 

Sex

Crude references to genitals, thongs, and sexual activity, parts of which are bleeped. Some bathroom humor. 

Language

Curses are bleeped, but the word "g--damn" is occasionally heard.

Consumerism

Old Spice is the sponsor of the show, but isn't referenced during interviews. Sports logos like Adidas and Nike are sometimes visible on athletes' clothing. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Occasional quick references to drinking, steroids and performance enhancing drugs. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Cold as Balls is a fun, but rather crude, post-game series starring comedian Kevin Hart as he interviews athletes in locker room tubs of icy water. There’s no nudity, but there’s lots of quips containing strong sexual innuendo, references to drinking and performance enhancing drugs, and other strong themes. There’s plenty of bleeped cursing ("g--damn" is audible), and a few borderline sexist and racist jokes.. Old Spice is the sponsor of the series, and sports clothing logos like Adidas and Nike are visible. 

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What's the story?

COLD AS BALLS stars actor and comedian Kevin Hart interviewing athletes in ice baths. From meeting five-time NBA All-Star player Blake Griffin, to horsing around with three time gymnastics Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglas, Hart spends each 8-10 minutes in a locker room talking to a single guest about their childhood, career choices, and other details while trying to get used to the freezing water. The athletes also get a chance to ask Hart some sports-themed questions, which often leads to some cold consequences.  

Is it any good?

This lighthearted series features Kevin Hart talking to professional athletes using his trademark sharp quips, which are designed to make them as uncomfortable as tub of ice water. The humor also comes from the straight-laced vibe of his guests, most of whom often seem more annoyed than amused by his antics. 

Most of the interviews revolve around Hart himself, who barely gives the athletes a chance to respond to his questions as he launches into his banter. A lot of it is funny, but sometimes he goes slightly overboard by purposely making inappropriate references, including sexist and racially motivated comments, to create some awkward moments. Nonetheless, Cold as Balls will appeal to sports fans and Hart fans alike. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the reasons comedians often push the envelope when it comes being funny. What's the best way to approach social issues like racism and sexism? When does it go too far? Who decides?

  • Is Cold as Balls really about the athletes being interviewed? Or is it a vehicle for Kevin Hart’s comedy? 

TV details

For kids who love comedy

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