Cooking on High

TV review by
Marty Brown, Common Sense Media
Cooking on High TV Poster Image
Cannabis-themed cooking competition is almost too mellow.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

They do make an effort to be educational about marijuana, but that's almost strictly for recreational users.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The chefs competing are typically entrepreneurs and craftspeople, and are fairly creative. 

Violence
Sex
Language

There's a lot of casual swearing: "f--k," "f---ing," "s--t," etc.

Consumerism

Most cooking shows function as PR for the chefs and their restaurants. In this case, Cooking on High advertises marijuana.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Literally everyone on this show is eating marijuana and talking about smoking it. Each episode, Bealum shows and talks about a particular strain of weed that the chefs will be cooking with. Most episodes end with everyone visibly high. Lots of jokes about slipping marijuana into someone's food without their knowledge. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Cooking on High is a competition show where chefs make food using cannabis. There are disclaimers that the marijuana is used for medicinal purposes and, in fact, many of the chefs have experience with using marijuana and food to treat medical conditions. That being said, it's clearly a show about recreational marijuana use: Nearly everyone who appears on-screen is either high or on their way, and nearly all of the conversation centers around getting stoned. For some families, it may open up conversations with older teens about the changing mores regarding marijuana use and its place in society. 

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What's the story?

COOKING ON HIGH features two chefs competing for a prize called "The Golden Pot." The chefs are given a broad theme, like breakfast or vegetarian, and are asked to create meals that use a specific strain of marijuana, introduced by "writer, educator, and publisher on all things ganja," Ngaio S. Bealum. While the meals are being made, host Josh Leyva chats with the guest judges (usually comedians) about their experiences with marijuana. Bealum does his best to drop tidbits of information about marijuana, including its history and usage.

Is it any good?

This fun but almost too laid-back competition was obviously made quickly and sloppily: Guest judges are unrecognizable, there's an absence of drama, and the chefs aren't even competing for money or prizes. That being said, there's an extremely low-key charm to its complete lack of ambition. It's as if the producers of Cooking on High aren't even really trying to create a competition, but a chill kickback where a bunch of friendly stoners can chat about their marijuana hobby while they partake in it -- the equivalent of, like, a pottery class, but for weed lovers.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about marijuana. Does the show teach you anything about the use of marijuana? What does Cooking on High say about American culture in relation to marijuana?

  • Why are cooking competition shows so popular? Do you think they change the way people cook at home, or see food in general? 

TV details

For kids who love cooking shows

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