Crank Yankers

TV review by
Lucy Maher, Common Sense Media
Crank Yankers TV Poster Image
Puppet pranksters set iffy examples for teens.

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The show revolves around crank calls and sends the message that it's OK to make fun of others if it ends in laughs.

Violence
Sex

Some sexual innuendo, such as slang words for intercourse and male genitalia.

Language

"F--k" and "s--t" are bleeped; words like "penis" and "gangster-ass" are used.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this series features puppets acting out prank phone calls that were previously recorded by comedians like Jimmy Kimmel, Sarah Silverman, and Dane Cook, who all have lots of appeal for teens. While almost every kid has made one of these usually harmless (if annoying) calls at some point, they seem more offensive when they're acted out on screen -- it's disturbing hearing innocent people being made fun of in a passive-aggressive way. There's some iffy language, too, though the worst is bleeped.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written byPlague December 15, 2009

Crank Yankers

Waste of time and space. Dont even bother spitting in the TV's direction when this show is on.
Adult Written bydanny 7000 November 11, 2017

Crank Yankers is a Adult puppet show

i think crank yankers is a amazing show but its not for kids its a puppet show for Adults is very raunchy and has lots of swearing like ass hell f*** and s*** h... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written byshots April 9, 2008

good

its pretty good show 12+ up should watch this

What's the story?

In CRANK YANKERS, comedians like Adam Carolla, Jimmy Kimmel, Sarah Silverman, and Dane Cook lend their voices to prank-call-making puppets. The comedians make the calls, their voices are recorded, and later puppets act them out for the show. Each episode features several segments that range from the absurd (a woman who says she has a penis-like appendage tries to explain her unique anatomy while making a bikini wax appointment) to the silly (a shopper reports her lost juice to the security office at a local mall). Some of the calls have a fair share of sexual innuendo, as when a harpist who is called upon to join a hip-hop tour says she has to end the call to get some wood from the carpenter. The hip-hop artist to whom she had been speaking then giggles and says, "Yeah, go get some carpenter wood."

Is it any good?

Crank Yankers targets the same audience as Jackass and Beavis and Butt-head: goofy guys who get off on inane pranks. Save for a few bleeped-out curse words, there's nothing here that most kids haven't already done ... although that doesn't mean that watching won't inspire them to do more.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about practical jokes. How does it feel to be on the receiving end of a prank? Is it OK to get a laugh at someone else's expense? What's the difference between laughing at someone and laughing with them? Which is more respectful? Do you think the comedians participating in the show ever feel bad about the people they trick?

TV details

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