Cupid

TV review by
Kari Croop, Common Sense Media
Cupid TV Poster Image
Love dramedy is aimed at adults' hearts, not kids'.

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Some episodes include morally shady situations (like one in which a woman is having an affair with a married man), and a few white lies are told. But in general, the action focuses on characters finding true love.

Violence
Sex

The man character purports to be the god of love. There's manufactured sexual tension between the title character and his doctor (at the bar, he propositions her with lines like "Sex on the Beach, Screaming Orgasm ... after-hours grope on a lunatic's futon?"). There's also some passionate kissing and references to sex -- although, in general, it's suggestive rather than graphic. One character makes reference to a "chastity pledge."

Language

Infrequent swearing (mostly words like "damn") and some descriptive phrases like "trashy lingerie" and "drain the dragon."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

The title character works as a bartender at a bar called Tres Equis (XXX). As a result, adult characters are often shown drinking socially, consuming everything from beer and mixed drinks to tequila shots. But characters usually don't drink to excess.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this relationship-oriented dramedy is aimed squarely at adults -- specifically single women. To that end, it's peppered with sexual innuendo and suggestive quips, like the title character's belief that "Love is passion, love is heat, chemistry, sex." Scenes regularly take place in a bar, which means adult characters are often shown drinking socially. There's also an ongoing flirtation between the title character and his doctor. But language is mild, and violence isn't an issue.

User Reviews

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Teen, 16 years old Written bytopwinslendji April 15, 2009

+13

i like that movie

What's the story?

In CUPID (a remake of a short-lived 1998 series by the same name starring Jeremy Piven in the title role), level-headed psychiatrist Claire McRae (Sarah Paulson) does her best to keep tabs on Trevor Pierce (Bobby Cannavale) -- a charismatic new patient who believes himself to be the Roman god of love. According to Trevor, he must match 200 mortals in 100 true-love partnerships before he can win his way back onto Mt. Olympus, so he's determined to pair up as many singles as possible.

Is it any good?

If you're looking for a series about love with the feel of a neverending romcom, Cupid just might fill the bill ... but it won't quite sweep you off your feet. For starters, there's no palpable chemistry between Trevor and Claire, although you get the feeling from the script that there's supposed to be. And Cannavale's Cupid? Well, he certainly looks the part. But when he opens his mouth, he sounds more like a tough-talking extra from Goodfellas. It's a curious choice, to say the least.

Criticism aside, Cupid does pull off some effective tugs at the heart strings with scenes that evoke genuine emotion (and it does so in a much more charming way than a show like the now-canceled Valentine, a series about Greek gods and goddesses living on Earth). Whether it catches on is up to the viewing public, but at least its heart is in the right place.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the show's messages about love and relationships. Do you think it has a realistic, healthy take on what makes a relationship succeed? Why do so many shows revolve around romantic tension between main characters? Families can also discuss the myths and legends surrounding Cupid/Eros, the god of love and beauty who inspired the title character. Why is Cupid often associated with Valentine's Day, and what other influences has he had on our language and culture?

TV details

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