Digby Dragon

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Digby Dragon TV Poster Image
Sweet friendships, fun adventures trump demanding behavior.

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 14+
Based on 2 reviews

We think this TV show stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational value

The show intends to entertain rather than to educate, but the characters' experiences show kids how trying new things and embracing adventure can yield fun learning. Also reminders of the importance of persevering when plans get disrupted.

Positive messages

Kids see Digby and his friends faced with a new challenge or worry in each episode, which they must overcome with cleverness, ingenuity, and teamwork. In the process they learn that nothing worthwhile comes easily and patience is a virtue. In some cases a mischievous neighbor causes intentional trouble for them, leading to examples of the effects of negative behavior.

Positive role models & representations

Digby and his friends are kind and helpful, and they welcome new experiences, especially if they get to face them together. Grizel, on the other hand, is rude and unpleasant, looks to make mischief for others, and bosses around Mungo terribly.

Violence & scariness
Sexy stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, drugs & smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Digby Dragon is a preschool series set in a magical forest, and it centers on a young dragon and his friends. The characters' adventures reflect preschoolers' scope of the world, featuring stories about helping a friend with a difficult task, inventing creative ways to spend time, and trying to correct a mistake. Each story has strong themes about friendship, kindness, patience, and creative problem-solving. One character strives to cause trouble for Digby and his friends, usually by interrupting their plans or picking on them, and she's very bossy toward a mild-tempered member of the group.

User Reviews

Educator and Parent of a 9 and 13 year old Written byBarry S. April 16, 2017

What is this?

It seems to be completely nonsensical. Although the animation is OK, and the plots are well-defined, you probably couldn't find any of the situations comin... Continue reading
Adult Written byKendall A. December 1, 2017

Crudity, sexism, strong language make 'toon iffy for teens.

Parents need to know that the sexual references, crass humor, strong language, and irresponsible messages in this animated series ensure it’s not appropriate fo... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written bykendalljr90 October 11, 2017

Crudity, sexism, strong language make 'toon iffy for teens.

Parents need to know that the sexual references, crass humor, strong language, and irresponsible messages in this animated series ensure it’s not appropriate fo... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written bykendalljr7898 October 10, 2017

Crudity, sexism, strong language make 'toon iffy for teens.

Parents need to know that the sexual references, crass humor, strong language, and irresponsible messages in this animated series ensure it’s not appropriate fo... Continue reading

What's the story?

DIGBY DRAGON is set in a magical place called Applecross Woods, where forest creatures and magical ones live side by side. Adventurous Digby (voiced by Clark Devlin) always finds something new to occupy his time, from inventing new games to helping his friends Fizzy Izzy (Ainsley Howard), Grumpy Goblin (Dustin Demri-Burns), Cheeky Chips (Rasmus Hardiker), Archie (Lucy Montgomery), and Albert (Clive Russell) with the day's tasks. Sometimes their mischievous troll neighbor, Grizel (Montgomery again), catches wind of their activities and tries to interfere, causing all kinds of trouble for Digby and forcing them to rework their plans.

Is it any good?

Talking animals, magical creatures, and a meddlesome neighbor create much adventure that's right up preschoolers' alley. They're sure to relate to Digby's unrelenting enthusiasm for each new experience and his disappointment when things don't turn out as he'd planned. Most stories in Digby Dragon see the characters engage in backup planning for unexpected happenstances, usually at the hands of the irksome Grizel, which is a good reminder to youngsters of the need to be flexible in unpredictable circumstances.

As for the aforementioned Grizel, her pestering behavior is funny for a bit, but her persistent demands of her lackey, Mungo (Mark Heap), will wear on the nerves of parents after a while. She's relentless ("Bring me my blankie!," "I need my parasol!," "Don't interrupt me!") and stingy with appreciation for his efforts. Even very young kids will realize that hers is adverse behavior, but the sheer frequency of it does get a bit tiresome.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Digby's world. Where do you see evidence of magic in Digby Dragon? Does it seem like a nice place to be? How might you change to fit in there?

  • Why does Grizel insist on being so meddlesome? If you encountered someone like her, how would you deal with his or her actions? Why is it important to consider other people's feelings instead of only your own?

  • Kids: How do you respond when things don't go as you'd planned? Is it disappointing? Alternatively, how does persevering through a difficult circumstance make you feel?

TV details

Character Strengths

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