Dino Dana

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Dino Dana TV Poster Image
Kid scientist can see real dinos in fun educational series.
 Parents recommend

Parents say

age 4+
Based on 9 reviews

Kids say

age 4+
Based on 1 review

We think this TV show stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

The show is an excellent primer of basic knowledge about dinosaurs like what they looked like, how and what they ate, how they protected themselves from predators, etc. There's general knowledge (some dinosaurs were scaly and others had feathers) and traits specific to individual dinosaur types. For kids who already know a lot about the topic, the show offers CGI re-creations of many different dinosaurs.

Positive Messages

Kids see a young scientist -- and a girl, at that -- in the making who's passionate about what interests her and always eager to learn more. When faced with a challenge, she uses what she knows and some critical thinking skills to come up with a solution. Usually her discoveries involve her older sister, and the two of them have a friendly relationship. Dana's family is diverse and also includes a very involved dad.

 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Dana is smart and curious, and she's able to draw comparisons between what she learns of dinosaur behavior and the problems she has to solve in her own experiences. She also makes the best of every situation and never lets a learning opportunity go to waste. Her older sister is infinitely patient with her.

Violence & Scariness

No violence, but some of the dinosaurs come across as menacing with sharp teeth, long claws, and loud roars. The fact that some larger ones eat smaller ones (and even babies) is discussed.

 

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

The series comes on the heels of its predecessor, Dino Dan.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Dino Dana is a continuation of the series Dino Dan. But this time a young female paleontologist acquires a special field guide that allows her to see dinosaurs in her everyday life. The show's blend of its live-action setting and the CGI animation that brings the dinosaurs to life will appeal to the imaginations of preschoolers, who see Dana learn by observing the creatures' behavior and applying what she discovers to a problem she's facing. Kids will learn dinosaurs' names, as well as pick up information on their general appearance, eating habits, defense mechanisms, and more. Also noteworthy is Dana's close relationship with her older sister.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written bywatchdog_mama September 19, 2017

Great show for siblings, kids of many ages, all dinosaur-lovers, and girls who only want shows about girls!

My family is loving this show. My 7.5-year-old son and 5-year-old daughter love watching this together. My son adores science and dinosaurs, so this show is per... Continue reading
Parent of a 6 year old Written byKrisW 1 December 6, 2017

Fantastic!

We are LOVING Dino Dana! I have a very scientifically curious 6 year old girl, so having a little girl being super-knowledgeable about dinosaurs, and also brave... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byQuinn Nichols February 12, 2018

HORRIBLE

THE ORIGINAL DINO DAN WAS BETTER WATCH THE ORIGINAL DINO DAN :(

What's the story?

Nine-year-old DINO DANA (Michaela Luci) loves everything about dinosaurs, and she's hard-pressed to find a book she hasn't read on the subject. So when a clerk at the library offers her his own Dino Field Guide to peruse, she can hardly believe her luck. Imagine her surprise when she discovers that not only does it challenge her to learn more about dinosaurs, but it also allows her to see them walking around her own neighborhood! Now Dana can use what she observes about the dinosaurs' behavior to answer her questions about them and to help her solve problems that come up in her own experiences.

Is it any good?

Just like Dino Dan before it, this combination live-action/CGI presentation will delight young dinosaur enthusiasts. The prehistoric creatures come to life in full color and size in and around Dana's home and community, dodging traffic on the roads and navigating the bookshelves at the local library but only visible to her. While the concept feels hokey to adults (Really? No one else sees that T. rex lumbering down the street?), preschoolers will eagerly overlook these kinds of logistical questions.

Dino Dana also does well in passing the baton from previous paleontologist-in-training Dan to a female scientist with all the know-how and enthusiasm of her predecessor. She's a great ambassador for girls in STEM learning and in the broader theme of following your passion in life. What's more, she enjoys a positive relationship with her older sister, Saara (Saara Chaudry), who encourages her interests.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about science. Kids: Are you fascinated by dinosaurs like Dana is? What other science subjects interest you? How does studying science help us understand the world around us?

  • How does Dana apply what she learns about dinosaurs to problems in her life? Why is it important to learn lessons from our experiences? When have you done so? How does this help us become a better problem solver in the future?  

  • Dana is surrounded by people who foster her interests. Who encourages you to follow your dreams? Where do you find inspiration and information about the subjects that interest you? Do you have role models, either in general or in those specific fields?

  • Families can talk about curiosity. Why is it an important character strength

TV details

Character Strengths

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Themes & Topics

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For kids who love dinos

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