Do or Dare

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Do or Dare TV Poster Image
Celebs compete for charity in fun Facebook game show.

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

You can have fun while earning money for charity. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

The celebs are good sports and are willing to do wacky things to earn cash for charity.  

Violence

Sumo and arm wrestling, shooting Nerf arrows at someone, and other activities are challenges. Protective gear used most of the time. Some competitive talk, but it's all in good fun. 

Sex

A sumo wrestler bares a lot of skin, but it's not sexual in nature. There are a few risqué jokes that will go over most kids' heads. 

Language

Words like "damn" audible; occasional bleeped curses. 

Consumerism

A range of charities, including St. Jude's and the National Alliance for Mental Illness are featured; donations to them are requested via Facebook. iPhone devices visible. Occasional references to celebs' TV shows or music.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Facebook's Do or Dare is a lighthearted game show designed to raise money for a wide range of charitable organizations. There's some goofy competitive talk, occasional bleeped language, and a few mildly risqué comments, most of which will go over young viewers' heads. Dares sometimes include stunts that could potentially result in injuries, including shooting toy Nerf arrows and body slamming a barely dressed professional sumo wrestler (though protective gear is sometimes used). Sometimes TV shows and music are referenced, and iPhones are visible. Viewers are also encouraged to donate to featured charities via the show's Facebook page. 

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What's the story?

From the creators of Lip Sync Battle comes DO OR DARE, a Facebook series designed to embarrass celebrities in the name of charity. Hosted by comedian James Davis, each episode pits two celebs, such as Jason Derulo and Keke Palmer, and Candace Cameron Bure and Andrea Barber, against each other while participating in a series of dares in front of a studio audience. The person who wins a brief preliminary challenge gets to choose if he or she will accept the first wacky dare, or pass it off to the challenger. Regardless of how well each of them do, they each are given $10K for their favorite charity. The second round ups the stakes and the dares' craziness factor in exchange for another $15K each. The person voted the best challenger by the studio audience also wins a gold helmet. Participating celebs also use the Facebook platform to ask for, and accept, additional donations from viewing audiences. 

Is it any good?

This zany game show features celebs having fun while raising awareness and money for their favorite charitable organization. They willingly subject themselves to things like getting pushed around by a champion sumo wrestler and getting slimed in order to get the funds.

Watching famous folks do goofy things is entertaining, but what also makes Do or Dare worth streaming is its clear focus on giving back and helping people in various ways. There may be competition, but on this show, everybody wins. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about some of the charities featured on Do or Dare. What will the money donated by these celebrities help them accomplish? Are all charities created equal?

  • If you had a chance to compete on Do or Dare, what charitable organization would you play for? Would there be any dares that you wouldn't accept?

  • How do streaming series differ from shows that air on television? Are there differences between shows that stream on social media platforms versus YouTube channels?

TV details

For kids who love game shows

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