Don't

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Don't TV Poster Image
Silly game show rewards physical discomfort; has cursing.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The objective of the show is to win as much money as possible. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Contestants are often humorous and self-deprecating. They're all willing to look foolish. 

Violence

Games can potentially be very physical. Contestants are pushed, hit with large objects, knocked over, etc., but no one gets hurt, despite sometimes looking like they’re suffering. Sometimes contestants mildly insult one another. 

Sex
Language

Words like "hell" and "bitch" are audible, but stronger language is bleeped. 

Consumerism

Disney movies and characters are promoted by the show through props, jokes, and messages to the TV audience. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

There are occasional references to drinking.    

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Don’t is a game show hosted by Adam Scott that features contestants completing challenges that often lead to pushing, getting knocked down, driven to exhaustion, and other non-threatening physical discomforts. There’s some cursing like "hell" and "bitch"; stronger language is bleeped, usually with mouths covered. Trivia questions often reference pop culture, and Disney themes, characters, and movies are promoted throughout the show. 

Wondering if Don't is OK for your kids?

Set preferences and get age-appropriate recommendations with Common Sense Media Plus. Join now

Continue reading Show less

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

Created by Ryan Reynolds and hosted by Adam Scott, DON’T is a game show that requires contestants to participate in over-the-top challenges to win lots of money. A team of four players compete in rounds of games together, during which they endure being hit, pushed, or other physical discomforts. Successfully completed rounds earns them cash, which can potentially add up to $100,000.

Is it any good?

This absurd series features participants competing in overcomplicated contests designed to make them look like they’re in a knockabout comedy show. Teams play to win as much money as possible in each round, which they get to hold on to regardless of what happens in later challenges. As a result, the show relies on the players awkwardly making their way through each game (and on the instant replays and screen captures of their goofiest moments) to make it more entertaining. Some of the show’s running gags are funny, while others suffer from bad timing. Overall, Don’t requires too much from its TV audience, as well as its contestants, to make it worthwhile.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the difference between having fun with game show contestants verses making fun of them. When do jokes and games cross the line? Does Don't cross it?

  • If you were to create a game show, what would the contestants be asked to do? Who would you want to host it? What would the prize be?

  • What are some reasons you think people willingly participate in silly game shows? Is it all about the money? A chance to be on television? Or is it just to have the experience? 

TV details

  • Premiere date: June 11, 2020
  • Cast: Adam Scott
  • Network: ABC
  • Genre: Game Shows
  • TV rating: TV-14
  • Available on: Streaming
  • Last updated: June 26, 2020

Our editors recommend

For kids who love game shows

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

Streaming options powered by JustWatch

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality.

Learn how we rate