Double Dare 2000

TV review by
Andrea Graham, Common Sense Media
Double Dare 2000 TV Poster Image
Slippery, slimy fun for the whole family.
Parents recommend

Parents say

age 4+
Based on 6 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 7 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Families have fun and work together. Competition is strong, but most participants are good sports.

Violence & Scariness

Contestants do things like throw pies at each other and compete in physical challenges, but it's all in fun and no one gets hurt.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Prizes are all name-brand products.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this family-friendly game show based on the classic Nickelodeon show Double Dare features zany competitions involving things like pie fights, silly trivia questions, and a messy obstacle course. The show promotes family teamwork, patience, and cooperation as two families face off in three rounds of slimy, sloppy debauchery in hopes of winning the grand prize. Teams don't always win, but good sportsmanship is a strong message.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byjillianlovescats April 9, 2008

Double Dare 2000 rocks!

I think there should be a Double Dare for Adults! Way to go Harris!
Adult Written byChuck Reid March 16, 2012
This is one of my favorite game shows of all time.It is fun for the whole family! If they put it on The 90s Are All That record it or stay up late! This premire... Continue reading
Kid, 9 years old April 9, 2008

I laughed!

I DO:I LIKE YOU STARTED THIS SHOW. I DON'T:I DON'T LIKE YOU GIVE CHEAP PRIZES AWAY. I DONT LIKE YOU RUSHING THEM.
Teen, 16 years old Written bysb1254 May 15, 2011

A great family show.

While one of the reviews said and I quote, "the world f--k and s--t or p--s are used" I couldn't dissagre more. That is completely misleading, I... Continue reading

What's the story?

In each episode of DOUBLE DARE 2000, two opposing family teams compete. Each family is asked a silly trivia question; if they can't answer it -- or assume the other team won't be able to, either -- they can dare the rival family to take a shot at it. In turn, the opposing team can volley the question back by suggesting a double dare or a physical challenge. If a team chooses not to answer the question and agrees to the challenge, members take part in a mini competition that more often than not involves some kind of sticky, slimy liquid. The team with the most points at the end of the regulation competition earns the chance to enter the obstacle course, where members must use their athleticism and determination to secure flags in exchange for cool prizes.

Is it any good?

While no team goes home empty-handed, be prepared for some heartbreaking frowns and grimaces as kids watch their parents fumble around and lose the competition. Think of it as an opportunity to point out that even though the team lost, they tried their best and are still a family of winners.

Overall, Double Dare 2000 is a fun, action-filled game show that families can watch together -- amid all the slime are some good messages about family togetherness. Just don't be too surprised if your kids suggest pie fights after watching the show, or if you discover that your family room has been turned into a temporary obstacle course.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the different dynamics of each team. Although the situations are far from ordinary (most families don't team up in everyday life to throw pies and smash slime-filled balloons), the message about the importance of family cooperation is clear. How can families face problems together? How does cooperation benefit a group? Is winning really the most important aspect of a competition? If not, what is?

TV details

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