Dr. G: Medical Examiner

TV review by
Scout Davidson, Common Sense Media
Dr. G: Medical Examiner TV Poster Image
Forensic series is bloody without being violent.

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 4 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

When causes of death turn out to be vice-related, the dangers of said vices are clearly explained.

Violence

No actual autopsies or body parts are shown on screen -- corpses are portrayed by actors. Occasional stock photos of organs are used for explanations or diagrams. Dr. G usually has real blood all over her apron. Other footage shows blood being rinsed off equipment, etc.

Sex
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Alcohol and other drugs can be the cause of death in some patients. Neither are presented in any kind of glamorous light.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that although no graphic violence or medical procedures are shown on screen during this show about forensic pathology, they're discussed in detail and could prove traumatic for young teens and tweens. The pathologist at the center of the show frequently has real blood on her apron, and there's plenty of footage of blood being rinsed off/away, but all bodies are played by actors. Alcohol and drugs come up as causes of death in some cases.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 6 year old Written bytmj2037c January 1, 2010

needs parental supervision

it is gruesome...it is death, but it is real life ...which kids needs to be exposed to some...not every day or forced, but exposed to. my 6 yr old has watched... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old May 7, 2011

A great medical show for teens and adults!

This is a great forensic show! I am sure that teens and adults will like it! 11 and 12 year olds can watch it too, but not anybody smaller than 11. The show has... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byCSM Screen Name... February 15, 2010
Dr. G is a very clean show, the worst portions being in how some of the people died, whether it was related to substance abuse, suicide, murder, or some freak h... Continue reading

What's the story?

DR. G: MEDICAL EXAMINER focuses on the real-life work of Dr. Jan Garavaglia, a Florida-based forensic pathologist. Each episode investigates a different unexplained death, which Dr. G solves using what the show's producers call "cutting-edge forensic science and technology" but what usually amounts to your basic trial-and-error method.

Is it any good?

While occasionally intriguing, the show falls short -- it's stuck trying to be appropriate for children and families while remaining entertaining for adults. On the one hand, the show's producers are extremely careful to blur out any footage of organs, autopsies, or even cadavers when they might be visible on an operating table. Every shot of Dr. G performing any kind of procedure is staged with actors, with the word "dramatization" prominently splashed across the screen. The show's creators seem to want to make sure that you know that you and your family are in no way seeing actual dead bodies.

At the same time, there are lots of stylized shots of blood being rinsed off tables, into drains, and dripping down the legs and wheels of gurneys. And the show doesn't shy away from talking about violence. In one episode, for example, the narrator questions whether a patient's mysterious death could have been the result of a rape/murder, and Dr. G. frankly discusses the methods she uses to determine such facts. These kinds of gory details may be of prurient interest to adult audiences, but the show is visually over-sanitized to the point of being dull. On the other hand, these same gory details, even though not shown on screen, could be too intense for young viewers. The perfect demographic for a show like Dr. G is probably a teen with strong interests in health and science. Beyond that, most viewers will likely either find the show too boring or too scary.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what makes this show (and others like it) appealing. Are the crimes discussed on shows like this one more or less upsetting than the ones on fictional shows like CSI? Why? What audience do you think the show is trying to attract? Does it succeed?

TV details

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