EJNYC

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
EJNYC TV Poster Image
Shallow reality spin-off filled with silly drama, fashion.

Parents say

age 18+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Sibling, family relationships are complicated.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Cast is self-absorbed and privileged, though entertaining at times. EJ and Elisa are close.

Violence

Lots of arguing.

Sex

Strong sexual innuendo, dating issues discussed.

Language

"bitch," "ass"; curses bleeped.

Consumerism

Endless high-end labels like Cristal, Fendi, Chanel, Prada, Dior, etc.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Lots of social drinking (wine, champagne, etc. )

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the reality series EJ NYC, a spin-off of #Rich Kids of Beverly Hills, contains lots of arguing, strong sexual innuendo, and social drinking (wine, champagne). Curses are bleeped, but the word "bitch" is uttered more than frequently, and words such as "ass" are also audible. There are tons of high-end products and labels featured, including Cristal, Fendi, Chanel, Prada, and Dior. There's some discussion of family and pursuing a career, but most of the messages here are pretty superficial.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byLisaAtLarge July 6, 2016

Not a children's show

Rich kids, Yes. Role models, no. This show lacks humility, integrity, and respect. I would never want my children to identify with the insensitive and pompous... Continue reading
Adult Written byCECEEnyc July 13, 2016

Hmmmm, Yeah, Okay?

Upon viewing the first episode of the show, I felt like it had a lot of potential. However, I have to say at the third episode I realized that there was a funda... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

EJ NYC, a spin-off of the reality series #Rich Kids of Beverly Hills, follows former cast member EJ Johnson as he returns to New York City to break into a fashion career. Best known for being the flamboyant son of legendary NBA basketball player Magic Johnson, he arrives with his designer outfits, accessories, and plans to move in with his sister, fashion student Elisa. Sparks fly as the close siblings get used to living with each other again, so they each turn to their own friends, including Drew, Sanaz, and Kyle, who are members of EJ's inner circle, and Samaria Smith, Elisa's best friend and the daughter of LL Cool J. EJ enjoys the high-end social life that his new home offers him, but he soon discovers that breaking into the fashion industry is extremely difficult.

Is it any good?

Like its sister show, this obnoxiously shallow series features all the highs and lows of self-absorbed people living privileged lifestyles in New York City. The immature, argumentative behavior is endless, and the constant high-fashion label dropping, exclusive parties, and other events only add to the lack of depth displayed here.

EJ's colorful behavior and flashy outfit choices may be entertaining to some, but they're often caricature-like, making it hard to take him seriously. Meanwhile, it's his sister Elisa, whose agitation is expressed more quietly, who often steals scenes. There's not a lot of substance here, but might fit the bill if you're looking for a guilty pleasure.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how people appear on reality shows vs. how they are in real life. Do you think the cast of this show acts the same way when they're not on camera? Do they socialize or party as much as it seems? Or does the show make it seem that way to make their lives more interesting for viewers?

  • Often TV-sponsor product brands and labels are featured in reality shows. But when does this go too far? What are some ways featuring products on a TV show specifically targets kids?

TV details

For kids who love reality TV

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