Everyone Is Doing Great

TV review by
Joyce Slaton, Common Sense Media
Everyone Is Doing Great TV Poster Image
Drugs, drinking, language, sex in indie Hollywood comedy.

Parents say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 16+
Based on 2 reviews

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The overall feel is that of a black comed. Morals and principles are typically shucked in favor of schmoozing and making money, although those choices don't tend to pay off for everyone concerned. The entertainment world is alternately fabulous and ridiculous, and fame is portayed as fleeting. There is some redemption as the series winds down, with messages about support, friendship, the value of rewarding work, and envy. 

Positive Role Models

Both Jeremy and Seth are somewhat lost and drifting. Seth has the most drive and consequently is rewarded with opportunities, while Jeremy drinks and uses drugs to cope with his lack of direction. The two are at least supportive of each other and asking questions about what they should be doing with their lives, even if they don't have great answers. 

Violence
Sex

Sexual content is frequent and frank. A couple kisses and falls into bed, then the man prods his pelvic area and says "it'll go," implying that he's having difficulty performing. Later, he props up his phone and uses a picture of a girl in a bikini to masturbate; we see his hand moving suggestively. Other scenes include non-sexual nudity (a man on the toilet, wiping; private parts are not visible), and a scene in which a character is asked to use a pillow as a "love interest." In an extended scene, he moves his body as if having sex with the pillow, moaning and panting. Characters talk about "hooking up" and "getting laid," and have consequence-free casual sex. 

Language

Cursing includes "f--k," "f--king," "badass," "s--t," "damn."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Many scenes show characters smoking marijuana and drinking, sometimes to the point of sloppiness and silliness. In one scene, characters snort lines of cocaine and argue over whether it's okay to use a $1 bill or if a $100 is more acceptable. Characters use drugs and alcohol to handle their emotions and problems. We do see the consequences, which include problems in relationships and loss of work. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Everyone is Doing Great is a comedy series about actors who have trouble getting work after being typecast on the successful teen vampire drama they both starred in. Mature content is frequent, including drugs and drinking. Many scenes show different characters smoking marijuana and drinking, often to the point of being sloppy, self-pitying, and silly. Characters snort cocaine and argue about what denomination of bill to use. Drinking and drug use is not glamorized -- it appears as if characters are using to deal with their problems, and they suffer consequences from hangovers to losing jobs and relationships. Sexual content is also frequent. Characters talk about "hooking up" and "getting laid" and have consequence-free casual sex. There are also visuals of a man masturbating (we see his hand moving suggestively and a picture of a girl in a bikini on his phone), couples kissing before falling into bed, and non-sexual nudity (a man is seen on a toilet, private parts covered). Cursing includes "f--k," "f--king," "badass," "s--t," and "damn." Positive messages include themes of friendship and the value of rewarding work. Characters are often drifting and making mistakes, but they redeem themselves somewhat as the series goes on. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bykshea216 January 16, 2021

so good, real, raw, funny

You truly feel like you're there with the characters. Seth is likeable because he's hard working and a decent human and Jeremy is a fuck up that you c... Continue reading
Adult Written byNenelove January 16, 2021

Don’t waste your energy

If you have kids don’t watch a lot of drugs and language. It’s boring and has no real storyline unless your apart of the acting industry.
Teen, 16 years old Written byInahsyebk January 19, 2021
Teen, 17 years old Written byaaf_naley January 18, 2021

everyone is doing great

it’s a good funny show it’s so raw in a way that it’s just amazing acting yk and james lafferty love him my dad was actually watching it and he was laughing way... Continue reading

What's the story?

EVERYONE IS DOING GREAT -- a comedy created and written by former One Tree Hill co-stars Stephen Colletti and James Lafferty -- follows Seth and Jeremy, the formerly-hot duo in the hit teen vampire drama Eternal. Five years after it ended, both Seth and Jeremy are struggling. Seth strives endlessly to get acting work despite being typecast as a past-his-sell-by-date teen heartthrob. Jeremy, who married his Eternal co-star Andrea (Alexandra Park), is so depressed that he sits around the house smoking pot and flirting with fans on social media, while his wife has moved on to a successful TV starring gig. As these two friends continue their downhill slide, they wonder: Haven't they hit bottom yet? And isn't life supposed to start getting better once they have? 

Is it any good?

It doesn't break any new ground dramatically or comedically, but this series is affable and amusing enough to make it worth a look. Part of the fun of Everyone Is Doing Great is the notion that we're getting a behind-the-scenes peek at how the cinematic sausage is made, Episodes-style. It's easy enough to imagine that Jeremy and Seth are enacting the real lives of beloved yet also-ran TV stars: the brothers from Supernatural, and maybe, just maybe, the stars from One Tree Hill. Seth and Jeremy still have some of the spoils of fame. They're still stopped on the street by fans, usually rapturous young women, and their background gets them "in the room" at auditions, according to Seth, who's still trying hard to tread water as an actor while Jeremy's let himself go to pot (literally). 

But getting in said room is the other rich source of Everyone's comedy: the actor's life, with its diction exercises (Seth recites the alphabet while holding onto the end of his tongue) and humiliating demands (in an early scene, Seth is asked to tenderly make faux love to a pillow for long moments while casting directors watch and criticize his performance), as well as the outsized rewards that keep strivers struggling to stay in the game. If nothing else, Everyone will convince viewers that to be an actor is to sign up for layers of hell that even Dante never envisioned, which it turns out is fitfully funny to watch. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about fame and what it means to be a celebrity in American culture. What does it take to be successful in the entertainment business? If you had your own chance to be rich and famous, where would you draw the line?

  • How close does the series get to the realities of Hollywood, particularly when it comes to the creation -- and occasional destruction -- of art?

  • Jeremy and Seth use drugs and alcohol to relieve boredom and to self-medicate for pain and stress. Do they make drugs and alcohol look cool? Fun? Does this series glamorize drinking and drug use? 

TV details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love comedies

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