Feel Good

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Feel Good TV Poster Image
Funny, edgy, heartfelt romcom addresses addiction, love.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Relationships, albeit loving, can be complicated and difficult. Accepting who you are and the challenges you face in life can also be hard. Both require work. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

People are flawed but not necessarily bad. Mae is warm, sensitive, but struggling with her insecurities. George is struggling to accept herself and her relationship, despite loving Mae. Mae's mother can be distant. 

Violence

Some yelling and occasional pushing. References are made to stealing and serving time in jail.

Sex

Lots of strong sexual innuendo throughout, including references to sex acts and paraphernalia. Nudity (bare buttocks) is visible. 

Language

Swear words range from "p---y" to "s--t" and "f--k." Some rude gestures. 

Consumerism

Apple products are clearly visible. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drug addiction and sobriety are a major theme. Drinking and drug use are visible. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Feel Good is an adult-oriented romantic comedy series that features lots of cursing, strong sexual innuendo, partial nudity, drinking, and drug use. Addiction, sobriety, self-acceptance, and relationship challenges of all kinds are major themes.  Apple products are visible throughout the series. It's funny and heartfelt, but pretty mature due to its frank content about addiction and love. 

Wondering if Feel Good is OK for your kids?

Parents: Set preferences and get age-appropriate recommendations with Common Sense Media Plus. Join now

Continue reading Show less

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

FEEL GOOD is a romantic comedy starring comic Mae Martin as Mae, a young woman negotiating her comedy career, a new relationship, and her sobriety. Mae recently moved to England and is trying to restart her life while honing her comedy skills at the Gag Bin comedy club. But when she meets George (Charlotte Ritchie), she falls passionately in love. It's complicated, given that George is afraid to reveal the relationship to her friends and family. Adding to this is the fact that Mae is struggling with the fact that, despite years of sobriety, she is still an addict. It doesn't help that her relationship with her parents (played by Lisa Kudrow and Adrian Lukis) isn't an easy one, either. It's a journey filled with highs and lows, but lots of heart. 

Is it any good?

This humor-filled but sensitive semi-autobiographical romcom offers an honest story about a young woman who is trying to find her way while still struggling with insecurities brought on by her past. It doesn't offer an idyllic picture of two people newly in love, but instead highlights Mae and George's flaws, and points to the challenges they must overcome if they have any chance of holding on to each other. They are also extremely likable, as are most of the people around Mae, allowing viewers to appreciate her struggles without much condemnation.

It's well written, and what transpires throughout Feel Good isn't completely rooted in Mae Martin's standup routines. As a result, the narrative feels fresh and original. The appearance of great secondary characters, played by notable actors and comics like Sophie Thompson, Phil Burger, and Sindhu Vee, adds to the entertainment value of the show. If you're looking for a mature, heartfelt comedy, this one is worth checking out. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the way Feel Good portrays relationships. Mae and George love each other very much, so why are they struggling? How do they relate to their parents? Friends? Do these relationships have to be so difficult?

  • Do you think it's always necessary for media to show risky behaviors, like heavy drinking or drug use, to get a point across? Do those behaviors make it more entertaining? Or is there something else? 

TV details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love comedy

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

Streaming options powered by JustWatch

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality.

Learn how we rate