Fleabag

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Fleabag TV Poster Image
Quirky, mature U.K. comedy; cursing, strong sexual content.

Parents say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 15+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Death, grief, anger, coping, dysfunctional relationships are all explored. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Fleabag is struggling; she's not always nice or honest. 

Violence

Occasional yelling, arguments. A fatal accident is discussed. 

Sex

Raunchy humor; people in underwear, partial nudity, simulated sex acts. 

Language

"Bastard," "d--k," "c--t," "a--hole," "f--k." 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Wine, beer, shots, and the like; drunken behavior.  

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Fleabag is a dark British comedy about a woman trying to pull her life back together while navigating the modern world of London. It explores difficult concepts like death, grief, and dysfunctional relationships and features strong, raunchy sexual content (including simulated sex acts). There's some yelling, and cursing is frequent. Drinking and drunken behavior is visible. Still, it's a funny, well-written series for those mature enough to handle it. 

User Reviews

Adult Written byMichelle M. February 8, 2017

The anti downton abbey

Fleabag slowly paints a portrait of a 30 year old woman an instant before she hits rock bottom. The writer has created a scenario that, in just six short e... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byaimsflah January 15, 2017

Love it!

Personally, I think it's hilarious, and parents that think their children don't understand the concepts within this are perhaps babying them a bit too... Continue reading

What's the story?

FLEABAG is a dark British comedy about a woman trying to pull her life back together after the loss of her best friend while she navigates the modern world of London. It stars playwright Phoebe Waller-Bridge as Fleabag, who's grief-stricken after her best friend and business partner Boo (Jenny Rainsford) died of an accidental death. Now broken up with her pathetic boyfriend Harry (Hugh Skinner), she finds herself broke, confused, and trying to enjoy a more prolific sex life. While her family, including her estranged father (played by Bill Patterson), her stepmother (Olivia Colman), and her wealthy, uptight sister, Claire (Sian Clifford), knows that she's struggling, Fleabag refuses their help and pushes back against the world with anger and a willful, dry sense of humor. 

Is it any good?

This quirky, dark series, written and created by its star, is a powerful story about a depressed, emotionally vulnerable woman who is looking for ways to cope with the broken pieces of her life. The narrative style, which features Fleabag addressing audiences directly as events are unfolding, gives the show a creative flair that's enhanced by the strong writing and robust characters. Its decidedly British humor also gives the series a lot of edge.

Fleabag isn't always likable, and there are lots of awkward, uncomfortable scenes that will leave viewers both entertained and slightly troubled. But in between the lines of unapologetic wit and raunchiness is a strong undercurrent of sadness that invites audiences to view her situation with compassion. This emotional tension adds depth to the series, even if viewers aren't quite sure how they're supposed to feel about it. All of these details are what make Fleabag a well-crafted and complex series worth tuning in to. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the challenges that come with importing a show from another country to the United States (and vice versa). Would Fleabag have been a good choice for American network or cable TV? 

  • Fleabag makes a lot of decisions that are sometimes mean and potentially destructive. Does the fact that she's grieving justify her behavior? Why, or why not?

TV details

For kids who love dark comedy

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