Get Fresh With Sara Snow

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Get Fresh With Sara Snow TV Poster Image
Simple ideas for healthy living, the green way.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive messages

The series teaches viewers about improving their health and well-being through simple dietary and lifestyle changes like buying local products, recycling, and reducing energy use.

Violence & scariness
Sexy stuff

Rare mention of foods and supplements that are good for the libido.


Brandless organic products get a lot of attention, as do the companies whose recycling efforts are spotlighted (Patagonia, for example).

Drinking, drugs & smoking

Beer and alcohol bottles are shown in segments about recycling.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this series aims to help families create healthier surroundings by emphasizing the personal and environmental benefits of "green" changes like buying organic products, recycling, supporting local farmers, and decreasing energy use. References are made to medical ailments (like cancer) being linked to preservatives in food, hormones in dairy cows, pesticides on produce, and air quality problems in the home. Though tuning in with tweens may inspire some positive family lifestyle changes, if your kids tend to be worriers, this series could generate a sense of paranoia about the world's potential toxicity.

User Reviews

Adult Written bylibby1972 April 9, 2008

Pure as a driven snow with great advice for healthy living!

I have been watching Get Fresh with Sara Snow for almost 2 years and I love her show. She is refreshing, kind hearted and genuinely cares about what she doing... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old April 9, 2008

was really interested

this is very helpful for living eco friendly you may get bored a little butit is very important to watch

What's the story?

In GET FRESH WITH SARA SNOW, the titular natural-living expert explains how rethinking the foods we choose, recycling the products we use, and optimizing our energy efficiency can greatly improve our own well-being -- and that of the Earth. Snow visits with people and companies that are leading the way in the green living/sustainability movement. Guests show that a little ingenuity goes a long way, discussing everything from homes built of recycled materials and fueled almost solely by solar power to old clothing that's turned into brand-new items. One episode follows the lifecycle of a used yogurt cup that's remade into a disposable razor and later becomes the plastic lumber in a park bench. A stickler for freshness and firmly against food additives, Snow promotes organic products -- referring to the link between cancer and preservatives or dairy growth hormones -- and prepares simple meals that can benefit health.

Is it any good?

Snow and the experts she talks to lay out excellent cases for making small lifestyle changes that yield big benefits in overall well-being. They also stress how critical it is to reduce our resource consumption, showing the excessive waste that threatens to exhaust landfills and demonstrating how recycling can make a difference.

Get Fresh is great for families looking to take small steps toward a healthier life and better environment. But if your tweens are worriers, be careful -- some of the details about food and environmental health risks can be frightening.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the media's coverage of environmental and health issues. Do you think it's impartial/objective? What influences the media's messages on these topics? How can the media affect our impression of controversial issues in general? Families can also discuss the potential benefits of a more naturalistic approach to life. What are some of the potential dangers in the food we eat, the cleaning products we use, and the air we breathe? How can they affect health and the environment?

TV details

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