Goliath

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Goliath TV Poster Image
Compelling, gritty crime series has nudity, cursing, drugs.

Parents say

age 17+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The concepts of justice, loyalty, revenge, redemption are explored, but the answers are always unclear.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Billy McBride is flawed: He's an addict, a dad, a good lawyer, but maybe not a good person. 

Violence

Fatal explosions, beatings; a teen is tased; a hit-and-run; blood, death.

Sex

Simulated sex acts, full frontal nudity visible. Prostitution is addressed.

Language

"Goddamn," "s--t," "f--k"; curses in Spanish. 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking (champagne, hard liquor), alcoholism; cigarette, pot smoking, cocaine use. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Goliath is a dramatic, gritty legal series featuring a flawed antihero. It contains lots of sexuality, including simulated sex scenes and full frontal nudity, as well as endless cursing, drinking, cigarette smoking, and various kinds of drug use. Addiction, revenge, and prostitution are also explored. Violent moments include a fatal hit-and-run, beatings, and a teen being tasered. It's not intended for kids and might be tough going for more sensitive viewers. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byRobert S. August 6, 2018

Season 1 is good, Season 2 is not

This is an adult show, so there is a bit of swearing and innuendo. Thorton is Billy McBride, a recovering alcoholic, so there is a bit of drinking as well. Wh... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

From renowned series creator David E. Kelly, GOLIATH is a dramatic series about a washed-up lawyer who finds himself trying a major case against the powerful law firm he helped create. Billy McBride (Billy Bob Thorton) was one of the most powerful trial lawyers in Southern California but now finds himself struggling with addiction and trying small-time cases. But when he's approached by attorney Patty Solis-Papagian (Nina Arianda) about the strange circumstances surrounding a fatal boating accident that killed her client's brother, he soon realizes the accident is somehow connected to a major defense contractor being represented by his former law firm. As he works with Patty and his former legal secretary-turned call girl Tania Raymond (Brittany Gold) to take the case to court, his former law partner Donald Cooperman (William Hurt) is pushing attorneys Callie Senate (Molly Parker) and second-year assistant attorney Lucy Kittridge (Olivia Thirlby) to stop him by any means possible, much to the dismay of the firm's general council, Leonard Letts (Damon Gupton), and partner Michelle McBride (Maria Bello), who also happens to be Billy's ex-wife. It’s a difficult, complicated, and risky situation, but McBride knows that he has the ability to beat this goliath -- and possibly redeem himself in the process.

Is it any good?

This entertaining series combines the tension of a well-developed legal procedural with the melodrama created by its troubled and deeply flawed antihero. Most of the characters, including Billy McBride, aren't particularly likable, nor are they guided by any sort of moral compass. However, they're well-developed and complicated, which makes them very compelling. 

The show's grittiness is enhanced by the use of dark, shadowy film noir-like techniques and sharp visual contrasts between the stark, monotone corporate law firm and McBride's seedy and colorful hotel-room-based practice. But these elements don't overshadow the legal maneuverings, which offer their fair share of narrative twists. Ultimately, what makes Goliath worth watching is that, simply, it tells a good story that's easy to get caught up in. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about incorporating things like cursing, tobacco and drug use, and other risky behaviors into TV programming. What’s the purpose behind it? Even though these shows may be intended for adult viewers, is it really necessary?

  • Many of the characters in Goliath and other shows will stop at nothing to win cases. Is this a true portrayal of what lawyers are like? Or do these representations serve more to perpetuate stereotypes about them?

TV details

For kids who love dark drama

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate