Good Game

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Good Game TV Poster Image
Gamer comedy is funny, sometimes reinforces stereotypes.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Highlights aspects of the gaming culture. Also points to stereotypes about gamers. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

They don't always get along, but they are a team. 

Violence

Games full of fantasy attacks and killings with all sorts of weapons. 

Sex

Strong innuendo; crude references to masturbation and other sex acts using words like "d--k," "balls." Games full of of sexist images; posters of partially dressed women also visible.

Language

"Bitch,"  "ass," "s--t," "f--k." 

Consumerism

References to Google, video games. Logos for Heineken, other labels partially visible. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Beer drinking, pot smoking (bongs visible).

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Good Game is a live-action comedy series about a group of video gamers. It's intended for mature audiences thanks to crude references, cursing, drinking, and pot smoking. There's lots of stereotyping, and violent, sexist video game imagery, too. All this being said, it points out some of the positive and negative aspects of the gaming world. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

GOOD GAME is a web series about two gamers trying to build a team to win one million dollars in a major esports (multiplayer video game) tournament. Alex Taylor (Dan Avidan) and Ryland Smith (Arin Hanson) need to find folks who can help them win at Killcore, an enormously popular and lucrative game. They assemble an eclectic team, including hacker Kamal Pasala (Rahul Abburi), tennis player Sam Kinsey (Jade Payton), and their landlord, Lorenzo Santella, Jr. (Michael Ornstein). They all have different reasons for signing up to participate, and they don't always get along. But they have to work together if they plan to beat the competition. 

Is it any good?

This mildly funny series offers a self-reflexive look at gaming culture and the people within it. While it highlights some of the misconceptions people have about gamers, it simultaneously reinforces common stereotypes about them. Meanwhile, it notes the potential for a gender-neutral playing field in the gaming world, while emphasizing visible sexism in the multiplayer universe. 

There's lots of crude humor, which sometimes makes it hard to appreciate the more serious points the show is making. Nonetheless, Good Game portrays a humorous world that gamers will understand. Appearances by the show's creators, gaming personality Jesse Cox and host Michele Morrow, add to the quirky moments. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about multiplayer video game competitions, or esports. What motivates gamers to compete in them? 

  • What messages are sent with the use of common gaming culture stereotypes throughout Good Game as a way of highlighting certain issues about it? Do you think audiences get the point? 

TV details

For kids who love games

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate