Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours To Hell And Back

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours To Hell And Back TV Poster Image
Restaurant revamp show is potty-mouthed and predictable.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Bad restaurants can be turned around if people are willing to do the work. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Ramsay is tough and foul-mouthed, but is trying to help. 

Violence

Lots of yelling, screaming, insult hurling, and tears. Things are thrown, and sometimes broken. Live and dead rodents visible, and sometimes cause big reactions. 

Sex
Language

Lots of rude comments and bleeped cursing with mouths blurred. Profanity is one of the chef's trademarks.

Consumerism

Breville brand kitchen utensils and appliances prominently featured. Local eateries are given the spotlight. Logos for brands like Apple and Microsoft are sometimes visible in the background. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Alcohol (wine, hard liquor, champagne) frequently consumed. Cigarette smoking sometimes visible. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours To Hell And Back is a reality series where the celeb chef helps failing restaurants with 24-hour transformations and his patented tough love. As is the case with most of Ramsay’s shows, there’s lots of yelling, screaming, and bleeped cursing (mouths blurred). Drinking (wine, hard liquor, cocktails) is frequently visible, and occasionally people can be seen smoking cigarettes. 

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What's the story?

GORDON RAMSAY’s 24 HOURS TO HELL AND BACK features celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay as he drives around the United States in a state-of-the-art mobile kitchen to help restaurants on the brink of collapse. After arriving at an eating establishment that's in dire need of help, his team installs hidden cameras to monitor the day-to-day operations. He then eats a meal in disguise, so that he isn’t treated differently from any other guest. After revealing himself to the restaurant owner(s) and staff, he shows them the hidden camera footage, and highlights the many problems that are leading to the business’ demise. They then have 24 hours to turn everything around and open their doors to customers. 

Is it any good?

This predictable reality series follows the traditional formula of Gordon Ramsay shows, which features the chef working with folks to save their restaurants. As is tradition, while he works with managers, chefs, and staff, he reminds them that he's not only helping their bottom line, but saving clientele from potential food poisoning when revealing some of the more disgusting conditions. Through the process, he uses his profanity-filled brand of tough love to do it. 

It isn’t particularly original, but 24 Hours To Hell And Back underscores the fact that social media has given the chance for customers to be vocal critics. This makes it necessary for restaurants to work extra hard to keep them happy if they want to remain in business. Overall, there are some positive endings here, but you may not want to watch these transformations while eating. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what it takes to run a successful restaurant. Is it just about serving good food? What other things need to happen on a daily basis to make sure an eatery has customers?

  • Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours To Hell And Back features quick restaurant transformations, but is this possible in real life? Could these owners make the necessary changes without his help?

  • Would Gordon Ramsay's TV shows be as popular if he didn't swear? Why does he swear so much? Is it appropriate behavior, even when he's angry? 

TV details

For kids who love cooking shows

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