HawthoRNe

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
HawthoRNe TV Poster Image
Heartfelt but mature drama from a nurse's point of view.

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 4 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Hawthorne is extremely pro-patient, but she often violates hospital protocol, as well as using her work to deal with the loss of her husband. Doctors are frequently shown looking down on nurses. An international doctor with an extreme accent accuses Nurse Sullivan of not speaking English. Hawthorne is a single mother; her daughter, Camille, often talks to her mother inappropriately. The hospital's staff is diverse.

Violence

Occasional pushing, shoving, and other rough behavior. Some scenes show bloody patients being found or wheeled into the hospital; one suicidal patient is shown standing on a rooftop ledge and then on the pavement with bloody wounds.

Sex

Some sexual innuendo, including references to “sexy” paramedics and subtle references to sexual pleasure when female nurses touch male patients.

Language

Language includes words like “damn," "hell," “bitch,” and (infrequently)  “s--t”.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Frequent references to prescription medications. Some patients are addicts.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this series about a headstrong nurse who will stop at nothing to help her patients includes some bloody images of patients and salty language like "bitch" and "s--t." There is also some sexual innuendo and some pushing, shoving, and arguing. Teens should be able to handle it, but the inappropriate way that Hawthorne's daughter talks to her doesn't send the best message. Sensitive viewers may also find Hawthorne's struggle to cope with her husband's death hard to watch.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bychilli August 12, 2009
Adult Written byAngel3 August 13, 2009

Great show to watch with your tweens and especially teens

The relationship between Christina Hawthorne and her daughter Camille is something teens/tweens can handle. Perhaps they can get a bird's eyeview of what t... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byayan9876 July 30, 2009
love it
Teen, 14 years old Written byiluvmyipod July 23, 2009

!!!!

Jada Pinkett Smith nails this shows. Without her great acting it would be nothing. She makes this show what it is. When you watch this show, you realize how tha... Continue reading

What's the story?

HAWTHORNE stars Jada Pinkett Smith as Christina Hawthorne, a driven nurse who will stop at nothing to help her patients at Richmond Trinity Hospital. She's supported by fellow nurse/best friend Bobbie Jackson (Suleka Mathew) and Ray Stein (David Julian Hirsh), a male nurse who's having a tough time being accepted in the female-dominated profession. Also joining the team is young nurse Candy Sullivan (Christina Moore). While Hawthorne fights for her patients' rights and well being, she struggles with the loss of her husband and raising her rebellious teenage daughter Camille (Hannah Hodson). This becomes especially difficult when working alongside Dr. Tom Wakefield (Michael Vartan), the oncologist who treated her husband.

Is it any good?

This character-driven series features all of the drama you'd expect from a medical show, but from the nurses' point of view. It highlights the struggles that nurses face while trying to help their patients and simultaneously dealing with patronizing doctors and an extremely bureaucratic medical system. The humanity behind what nurses do is driven further home by their personal stories -- particularly Hawthorne's struggle to let go of her husband.

While the show has plenty of heart, it's relatively strong content makes it a better fit for older audiences. There are lots bloody images of the sick and wounded and a fair bit of salty language. And some of the exchanges between Hawthorne and her daughter aren't always the most appropriate, either. But for teens and adults who like a good medical drama, this one will be sure to please.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how nurses and doctors are portrayed in the media. Is thier work as dramatic as it is on television? Do doctors and nurses have the same kind of camaraderie and/or face the same kind of antagonism in real life? Families can also discuss nurses' training. Why do some people choose to become nurses rather than doctors?

TV details

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