Hot Streets

TV review by
Mark Dolan, Common Sense Media
Hot Streets TV Poster Image
Unoriginal animated show produces few laughs.

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The show is silly, full of non-sequiturs and random humor, so it's hard to extract any real positive messages. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

The main characters are bumbling, foolish, and not that nice. 

Violence

Lots of shooting and exaggerated horror including exploding heads, melting heads, throat cutting, spinal cords getting ripped out, and cannibalism. 

 

Sex

Talk of masturbation and oral sex. Chubbie Webbers gets sexual pleasure from sucking on mummy wrappings as well as from belly rubs. A snake French kisses Agent French.

 

Language

"Dong," "s--t," and "f--k" are bleeped out but it's clear what's being said.

 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Chubbie Webbers snorts a powdery substance and can't get enough.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the animated Hot Streets serves up the familiar Adult Swim-formula of absurd dialogue, over-the-top violence, and crude humor but in a package that is neither clever nor funny. It's about two FBI agents, dim yet arrogant Branski and desperate-to-prove-himself French, who investigate the supernatural with the help of Branski's brainy niece, Jen, and dog, Chubbie Webbers. Teens may want to watch it because it features a character voiced by Justin Roiland of Rick and Morty fame, but there are better choices in the Adult Swim "animation for grown-ups" canon.

 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byItIsMeStacey July 8, 2018

Such a great show!

I made this account just to post this review, because I completely disagree with the assessment of the show. It's not "unoriginal" at all, and th... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

In HOT STREETS, two FBI agents, dim yet arrogant Branski and desperate-to-prove-himself French, investigate the supernatural with the help of Branski's brainy niece, Jen, and dog, Chubbie Webbers, a demented, pleasure-seeking Scooby Doo-type. Their cases concern various baddies -- brain monsters, mummies, snake cults who are all dispatched in a variety of gory ways. Lots of action is packed into the show's 10-minute running time.

Is it any good?

This series is a lackluster entry into the animated Adult Swim lineup. Unoriginal in premise, ugly in tone, and uninteresting to look at, Hot Streets appears to have been created by combining elements from other Adult Swim shows: Absurd skewering of sci-fi tropes? Check. Over-the-top gore? Check. Ironic banter? Check. Horny anthropomorphic animal? Check. And while this may be a recipe the powers that be think their shows need to follow, it's definitely not a guaranteed recipe for success.

The end product is an empty exercise in non-sequiturs, repetitive violence, and inconsistent characterizations. Is Branksi clueless or clever? Is French a bumbler or competent? Do the agents like each other, hate each other, know each other? Who can tell? Jen, the only female character, is the most recognizably human of the characters, but episodes often end with her humiliated. It's also very obvious that the creators are desperate to make Chubbie Webbers (voiced by Rick and Morty's Justin Roiland) into a meme-worthy breakout character. It might be the show's only reason for existing. But sorry, guys, he's no Pickle Rick.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about animation. Is it always for little kids? How has the world of animation changed in the last 20 years? 

  • Hot Streets episodes are only 10 minutes long. How does the shorter running time impact the show? How would having longer episodes change it?

  • Is this show a parody? What is it a parody of? What kinds of comedy are funniest to you? 

TV details

For kids who love quirky animation

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