I (Almost) Got Away With It

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
I (Almost) Got Away With It TV Poster Image
Ex-fugitive docuseries is violent and exploitative.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The moral is that crime doesn't pay, but the the real focus is on the different ways ex-fugitives were able to remain on the run thanks to fast thinking, law-enforcement error, and sheer luck.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Criminals and victims come from all walks of life. Many ex-fugitives express little remorse for the crimes they committed.

Violence

Guns, knives, sticks, and other weapons are visible. Criminal reenactments feature shootings, stabbings, and other violent crimes; bloody wounds and dead bodies are clearly visible. Gang activity and sex crimes are discussed.

Sex

Infidelity and prostitution are discussed. Women are sometimes shown in skimpy clothing; men are sometimes shown shirtless.

Language

Words such as "damn," "hell" audible; stronger vocabulary bleeped.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking (beer, cocktails, hard liquor), cigarette smoking, and illegal-drug consumption (marijuana, cocaine) visible in reenactments.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that I (Almost) Got Away With It features frank discussions about criminal behavior, and violent reenactments are replayed over and over again. Bloody wounds and murder victims are clearly visible, as are illegal activities ranging from drug trafficking to brutal assaults. Alcohol, cigarette smoking, and drug use are shown in reenactments. Some episodes are milder than others, but the overall series isn't meant for kids. Sensitive adults may have a tough time handling what's shown here, too.

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What's the story?

I (ALMOST) GOT AWAY WITH IT is a reality series about the crimes former and current inmates from around the world committed and the various ways they were temporarily able to avoid getting caught. Each episode features dramatic reenactments of criminals committing crimes ranging from bigamy and money laundering to drug trafficking and murder. Details about how they eluded authorities, including information about the people who helped them, also are provided. Amid the reenactments are real interviews with the ex-fugitives, the law-enforcement officials who hunted them down, and notable people connected with the recovery.

Is it any good?

I (Almost) Got Away With It seeks to entertain viewers by describing some of the strange and creative ways people try to get away from law enforcement. It also highlights the mistakes they make that lead to their capture. Adding to the drama are extremely violent reenactments, specific scenes of which are replayed throughout the entire episode.

People who like this sort of thing will find it interesting, but the nonchalant and unapologetic way most ex-fugitives talk about their crimes is disturbing. Discussions about the mistakes that law enforcement make and the loopholes in the system that make it easier for criminals to hide are frustrating, too. Ultimately, the show is less of a morality tale and more of an exploitation.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the reasons ex-fugitives agreed to be featured on a reality show. What do they get out of it? What are viewers supposed to gain from their stories? 

  • Is showing (and repeating) violent images on TV and in movies appropriate, even when it's done in an informative context? What's the impact of doing so? Are there ways to tell violent stories without showing so much violent content?

TV details

For kids who love reality TV

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