Jobs That Bite

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Jobs That Bite TV Poster Image
Animal jobs are exciting and potentially dangerous.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

It looks at an array of various animal-related jobs, and highlights the challenges of each one.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Brandt and most of the people he works with appear committed to taking care and protecting animals.

Violence

The dangers and injuries associated with the jobs Brandt performs are discussed, but only minor injuries like bruises or scratches are shown.

Sex

Occasionally subtle quips about animal's genitals are made. The process of impregnating cows is featured.

Language

Words like "ass" audible; occasional stronger words bleeped.

Consumerism

Toyota SUVs visible; locations like Lion Safari Park, Thunder Bay Ranch, and Chimpanzee Island are featured.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Rare jokes about animals avoiding drug tests. Drugs are administered to animals to treat them.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Jobs That Bite features actor Jeremy Brandt working with trained professionals at various animal-related jobs. It's family friendly, but most of the jobs featured here are very dangerous, and the potential injuries that can result are discussed. Viewers see animals sedated and blindfolded, and there are occasional mild quips about drug testing or genitals. A few words like "ass" or stronger bleeped languages pops up once in a while.

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What's the story?

JOBS THAT BITE is a reality series starring actor Jeremy Brandt traveling across the country to work at a variety of animal-related jobs, and to meet the professionals who do them every day. From milking camels at the United States' only camel dairy, to practicing lion dentistry at a safari park, he learns about many of the different responsibilities that game keepers, trainers, and veterinarians have when taking care of animals. It also shows the work that goes into a few food-gathering jobs, like shrimping. Information about the animals Brandt works with, job site safety, and animal-related trivia is also featured. Each job is interesting, but Brandt learns that working with the gentlest of animals can sometimes get pretty wild.

Is it any good?

Jobs That Bite offers a fun look at an array of animal-related jobs that exist, and the wide-range of dedicated people who work hard to do them well. There are lots of lighthearted moments, especially when Brandt finds himself chasing after goats and trying to outsmart chimpanzees.

It's more entertaining than educational, but some folks may find some of the medical procedures, which include people sedating and blindfolding captive lions and other animals with needles and tubes to treat them, a little disturbing. Nonetheless, animal lovers of all ages will find something appealing here.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the different kinds of jobs people do to keep animals healthy and safe. What kind of training do the people featured on this show have to have to do what they do? Do they ever get hurt? Are they ever afraid? 

  • Do you think some of the work these folks do in front of the camera happens every day? Or are these specific tasks shown to make the reality show more entertaining?

TV details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love animals

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