Kappa Mikey

TV review by
Larisa Wiseman, Common Sense Media
Kappa Mikey TV Poster Image
A home-grown anime series for the tween set.
Popular with kidsParents recommend

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 5 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 20 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Role models aren't exactly strong; the characters are two-dimensional, and, for the most part, they're either really high-strung, selfish, or dumb. One exception is the sweet and generous Mitsuki, who has a crush on Mikey and does everything she can to make him feel welcome in his strange surroundings. There is one brief mention of "working as a team," though the show doesn't make a huge effort to drive that point home.

Violence & Scariness

Futuristic (probably laser-powered) weapons are fired during the show-within-a-show scenes. No one is struck or injured.

Sexy Stuff

In keeping with anime style, one of the female characters wears some skimpy outfits.

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this show lacks meaningful substance and has little educational value, but aside from that, it's harmless entertainment. Any violence is confined to the LilyMu scenes (the superhero show-within-a-show portion of each episode), and characters are not harmed.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byprismamoon April 9, 2008

0 values, 0 brains

I try to find some good in everything, but I'm afraid I just can't find any in this show. The plot is flat and the characters are flat, plus the anima... Continue reading
Adult Written byAl Jackson April 21, 2012

I like Kappa Mikey,it's funny.

I really like this shout.I remember seeing it on Nicktoons many years ago.I was REALLY laughing!
Teen, 14 years old Written bybobobofan212 April 9, 2008
Teen, 14 years old Written byCSM Screen Name... April 9, 2008

What's the story?

Nicktoons' anime series KAPPA MIKEY follows American actor Mikey Simon, who wins the chance to star in the Japanese anime series LilyMu via a scratch-off card contest. Mikey delves into his new gig, suddenly finding himself living in Japan and adored by millions as the series' new superhero. His presence helps revive the show's sagging ratings, but not all of his co-stars are happy to have him around -- particularly the show's former darling, the jealous and petulant Lily. Fellow actors Mitsuki, Gonard, and furry little Guano are a bit more welcoming, helping Mikey adjust to his new life.

Is it any good?

If you're looking for substance and strong messages, you'll find them lacking; Kappa Mikey's entertainment value lies more in the constant blur of color and action (and dancing sushi between scenes) rather than the script. The show is also an odd mix of animation styles; to emphasize Mikey's fish-out-of-water situation, the creators made him look very flat and two-dimensional, whereas the other LilyMu cast members are drawn in typical anime style, with their facial features becoming strangely distorted according to their mood. Speaking of those moods, two of the characters, Lily and Guano, often throw screaming temper tantrums, which grates on the nerves after a while.

 

Kappa Mikey might be a bit more engaging if it had stronger plotlines and more likable characters; even Mikey acts like a dumb, inconsiderate college kid at times. The show generates a few laughs here and there, but the mix of animation styles and the high-strung characters are somewhat off-putting.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the characters' attributes. What are their positive and negative traits? How does each one set a good or bad example by his or her behavior? How could Lily moderate her behavior to be more likable? How could Mikey be more considerate of his roommates when he first moves in? How does Ozu create bad feelings between Lily and Mikey, and how could he be more fair and helpful?

TV details

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