Knightfall

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Knightfall TV Poster Image
Middling Knights Templar docudrama has sex, violence.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

age 16+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Christianity, Catholicism, anti-Semitism, and political strife discussed according to the norms of the Middle Ages. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

The Knights are rich and imperfect, but are committed to protecting the faith. 

Violence

Lots of bloody, gory violence during battle scenes and other confrontations (throats slashed, arrows lodged in hearts, blood spurting out of wounds, etc.).

Sex

Strong sexual innuendo, including a simulated sex act. An illicit affair is a major theme. 

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Wine occasionally visible. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Knightfall is a docudrama about the Knights Templar and their place in history. It features bloody battle scenes, gory wounds, and other images. It also features some strong sexual innuendo. There are some anti-Semitic comments that are offered within the historical context of the time (but are still disturbing); conversations about Christianity are common. Wine is occasionally visible. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 16 years old Written byShowboxuser January 22, 2018

Quite decent

It seems good so far, will keep watching

What's the story?

KNIGHTFALL is a docudrama that tells the story about the Knights Templar and their efforts to protect Christianity during a volatile period in history. Landry (Tom Cullen), Godfrey (Sam Hazeldine), Tancrede (Simon Merrells), and Gawain (Pádraic Delaney) are members of the powerful and wealthy secret brotherhood of warrior monks fighting on behalf of the Holy See. When they are not fighting battles in the Holy Land to preserve the faith and its most important relics, they remain in France to defend Christians and Jews who need to be protected from brutal marauders and other injustices. But the efforts of Pope Boniface VIII (Jim Carter) to usurp the authority of European kings leads to strife between the Vatican, for whom they fight, and their king, Phillip IV of France (Ed Stoppard), which puts the members of the Catholic military order in a difficult position. Meanwhile, their own human frailties lead to dark secrets and painful betrayals. The work of the mysterious order is complicated, but they are driven by their mission and are willing to pay for it with their lives. 

Is it any good?

This dramatic and violent series attempts to demystify the legend of the Knights Templar, a Catholic military order founded during the Middle Ages to protect pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem. It  reveals the secret missions that they were committed to, including securing the Holy Grail, and highlights the historic feud between the Pope and the King of France during a very tumultuous time. 

It has some big battle scenes and some mildly entertaining side plots, but Knightfall feels more Hollywood than historically accurate. Meanwhile, those who are not familiar with the history of the warriors will find it difficult to immediately understand the plotlines being presented. Some may enjoy it, but for fans of good history chronicles, it lacks profundity. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the history of the Knights Templar. What other names are they known by? Do they exist today? 

  • Does Knightfall have to show a lot of violence to show what life (and war) was like back then? What would the show be like without those scenes? 

TV details

For kids who love historical drama

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate