Knockout Sportsworld

TV review by
Will Wade, Common Sense Media
Knockout Sportsworld TV Poster Image
Sports clip show takes pleasure in athletes' pain.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 12+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The message seems to be that problems that can’t be solved by talking can be taken care of with your fists. The show glamorizes fighting, and the winners -- those still standing when the fight is over -- are deemed victors no matter what the reason for the conflict.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The show offers high praise for the victors in these matchups and sometimes jeers the people who have been knocked down.

Violence

The entire show is clips athletes taking beatings, often being knocked senseless. Featured sports include combat events like boxing, wrestling, and mixed martial arts, as well as sports in which violence isn't a requisite part of the game, such as hockey and soccer. Many of the images are intense, though the participants rarely seem to be seriously injured.

Sex

Some shots of women in skimpy attire.

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this show is made up of scene after scene of athletes knocking each other senseless. An exuberant narrator provides color commentary, which tends to glorify the violence whether it comes in the form of a sanctioned boxing match, an unexpected accident on the field, or an all-out brawl. Not surprisingly, there’s plenty of violence, though surprisingly few actual injuries.

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Teen, 13 years old Written byjameswarn August 28, 2010

knnockout sports-word teen review

I am a teen myself, and parents(espicially... well all) of them they see pre-teens as younger and not old enough for too many things, because we do not find it... Continue reading

What's the story?

A boxing match can take a long time -- sometimes it can be hard to tell who won even after 15 rounds. KNOCKOUT SPORTSWORLD gets right to main event: the knockout blow. This compilation show features clip after clip after clip of athletes being beaten into submission. And not just in the ring: Wrestlers and mixed martial artists make plenty of appearances, as do participants in any sport in which people might take a serious blow, including accidental collisions on the field and all-out, bench-clearing brawls. Basically, if an athlete gets pummeled on film, it might show up on Knockout Sportsworld.

Is it any good?

The show's premise is pretty simple, so it’s hard to go wrong. Anyone who likes to see the most intense moment of a match will certainly get their fill here. All of the action is commented on by a very exuberant narrator, who seems to take great delight in watching people take falls.

Actually, maybe a little too much delight. There’s a fine line between appreciating high-level athletics and taking pleasure in others' pain, and the commentary in Knockout Sportsworld straddles that line. There are certainly plenty of exciting moments, but some viewers might find the gleeful voice-over a bit unseemly.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about combat sports. Why do audiences enjoy watching sports in which the object is to beat an opponent into submission? Do these events have a different appeal than games where the focus is on scoring points? Why?

  • The show's narration seems to take great pleasure in watching people get beat up. How does that reaction make you feel?

  • How does the violence in this show compare to what you might see in a fictional/dramatic series? Which has more impact?

TV details

  • Premiere date: July 2, 2010
  • Network: Spike
  • Genre: Reality TV
  • TV rating: TV-14

For kids who love sports

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