Legends of Chamberlain Heights

TV review by
Joyce Slaton, Common Sense Media
Legends of Chamberlain Heights TV Poster Image
Raunchy, sexist basketball cartoon not funny enough.

Parents say

age 18+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 16+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Legends' trio of freshman basketball players yearn for recognition and power yet treat those around them with contempt and disrespect, especially one female character with a larger body type. We hear earthshaking sounds when she walks by, and her paramour urges her to keep their relationship on the "low low" and calls her "Jurassic Dark." 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Milk, Jamal, and Grover are profane, misogynistic, violent, and sneaky; they do remain loyal to each other. But parents would not want their children emulating these characters. 

Violence

Bullying and violence played for laughs: A white character is frequently slapped in the face when using the "N" word to refer to his African-American teammates; a senior member of a basketball team pulls his dirty jockstrap over the face of younger teammates. 

Sex

Very frequent references to and jokes about sex: cheerleaders performing a routine that refers to "hairy bush," jokes about "getting busy" in a fast-food bathroom, many euphemism for sex ("beating some cakes," "smashing that potato," "smashing va-jay-jay"). Characters are nude while showering (no genitals are visible) and moon each other. A plotline revolves around characters' trying to attend a party where they can have sex. A character has sex with a blow-up doll and then removes a condom. A husband buys a large vibrating penis for his wife. A character boasts he will "tear" a female character's "ass up" "like Kobe" (Bryant), possibly a reference to the star's sexual assault accusation.  

Language

Very frequent unbleeped cursing: "goddamn," "s--t," "bitch" (aimed at female characters); "f--k" and "motherf--kers" bleeped. Racial language: variations on the "N" word, African-Americans characters are called "hoodlums" and their music "jungle"; vulgar language: references to "hairy bush" and "dirt stains" on underwear; insulting language: Characters call each other the "N" word, "broke-ass," tell each other to "kiss my black ass." 

Consumerism

Real celebrities, such as LeBron James and Michael Clarke Duncan, are mentioned, as are movies.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A very young character sells drugs on the side of the road; the parent of one character buys and then gulps some type of pills. A filmstrip about drug abuse refers to "marijuana" and "Molly." Freshman characters offer to bring drugs, including marijuana, to a party and attempt to steal a brick of cocaine before attempting to make a new drug out of everything in their parents' medicine cabinets. Those who take the new drug wind up with unpleasant consequences. 

What parents need to know

Parents should know that Legends of Chamberlain Heights is an animated series about three benchwarmers on a school basketball team, but it's definitely not for kids. Bullying and violence are played for laughs: A white character is frequently slapped in the face when using the "N" word to refer to his African-American teammates; a senior member of a basketball team pulls his dirty jockstrap over the face of younger teammates. Lots of jokes about and many euphemisms for sex: "beating some cakes," "smashing that potato," "smashing va-jay-jay." A character has sex with a blow-up doll and then removes a condom. A husband buys a large vibrating penis for his wife. Expect very frequent unbleeped cursing: "goddamn," "s--t," "bitch" (aimed at female characters), with "f--k" and "motherf--kers" bleeped. A very young character sells drugs on the side of the road; the parent of one character buys and then gulps some type of pills. Freshman characters offer to bring drugs to a party, then attempt to beg, buy, and steal those drugs before making a new drug out of the dregs of their parents' medicine cabinets. 

User Reviews

Parent of a 6 year old Written byRudolf H. September 16, 2016

Racist, sexist garbage

Just another show that will be cancelled before the season is done. Dont bother. Its 20 minutes or racist sexist garbage that goes nowhere.
Adult Written byNicole S. November 8, 2016
This is the BEST show EVER on tv and all you caring about is the black boy slapping the white boy for saying the N word if it was the other way around you would... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written bybashed11 September 9, 2016

Another Cheap And Offensive Adult Cartoon

I've seen the first two episodes and boy its bad. The animation is just so ugly and lazy and the lip syncing is off to frequently. The main characters are... Continue reading
Teen, 17 years old Written byjamollies September 15, 2016

i mean it is the piolet episode

I definitely need to see an episode 2. The raunchines is quite high but the comedy balances it out. The reviewd I read about this show werent as i expected beca... Continue reading

What's the story?

In their dreams, best friends Grover, Milk (both voiced by Josiah Johnson), and Jamal (Quinn Hawking) are LEGENDS OF CHAMBERLAIN HEIGHTS: powerful, famous, compelling, and champions on the basketball court. In real life, the trio are lowly benchwarmers on the Michael Clarke Duncan High basketball team, scheming to get court time, get into parties, get girls. Grover has a life-threatening crush on an older girl; Jamal has a secret relationship with a girl he's ashamed of claiming in public; and Milk's busy trying to deal with his suspicious stepfather and out-to-lunch mom. But when they team up, the (possible future) LEGENDS are unbeatable. 

Is it any good?

Easily as profane as other adult animated series such as Archer and South Parkyet lacking the sharp wit and satire of those other series, this not-for-kids show is only fitfully funny. A series set on a high school basketball team and starring young African-American characters certainly sounds like it would lend welcome diversity to the small screen, and Legends' characters are lovable and amusing enough to win viewers over -- yet the way they talk about and treat the female characters on the show is a huge turnoff. Grover, Milk, and Jamal ogle their female classmates nonstop, predicting their chances of sex in the most vulgar terms, and viewing the young women mostly as interchangeable objects for male pleasure. A character with a large body type is particularly ill-treated: One character has sex with her and then urges her to keep it quiet, making jokes about her body as she stomps on- and offscreen as earthshaking noises fill the soundtrack. Plotlines about an attempt to engineer a party drug that gives its users diarrhea, and an elementary school character who sells drugs on the side of the road are no more appealing. 

The voice-over work and some of the jokes do land -- quips about racial diversity on cereal boxes and racial profiling are sharp and fresh. But the humor is generally so unkind that many comedy fans will be wincing instead of laughing. There is an audience that will find this show funny, but parents would probably generally prefer their own kids not be among it. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the satire that's buried beneath the series' crass jokes. What points are the creators trying to make? Does the show's over-the-top content detract from those points or help make them?

  • Who is this show designed to appeal to? Do you think the fact that it's animated gives it more "kid appeal" than a live-action version? Do you think people often assume that anything animated is OK for younger viewers?

  • Would you want to watch this show with your grandmother? What about a much younger brother or sister? Your mom? Your dad? Why, or why not? 

TV details

For kids who love comedy

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