Letterkenny

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Letterkenny TV Poster Image
Quirky, irreverent Canadian comedy has edgy jokes, cursing.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Series is a parody of a rural Canadian town. Family and friendship are themes. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Wayne is protective of his sister, a loyal friend, and not afraid to fight to keep his reputation. 

Violence

Fistfights and brawls are frequent; bloody wounds are visible. 

Sex

Strong, crude sexual innuendo for comedy's sake. Men are shown taking off their shirts and pants; bare bottoms are visible. References to bestiality. 

Language

Rude gestures; lots of cursing, including "s--t" and "f--k."

Consumerism

References to apps like Tinder and Grindr, celebs like John Wayne, Justin Bieber, etc. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Cigarette smoking. Beer, shots, and alcoholic beverages are consumed; drunken behavior is visible. Drugs, including crystal meth use, are discussed. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Letterkenny is an irreverent comedy series about a group of quirky folks in a small Canada town. With edgy humor that's geared toward older teens and adults, there's lots of cursing, crude sexual innuendo, and fistfights and brawls that lead to bloody wounds amongst the not-so-bright inhabitants of rural Letterkenny. There are references to apps like Tinder and Grindr. Beer, shots, and hard liquor are often consumed, and cigarette smoking is frequent. 

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What's the story?

Created by Jared Keeso, LETTERKENNY is a Canadian series about the antics of a group of people in a small Ontario town. Wayne (played by Keeso) and his sister, Katy (Michelle Myles), run a small farm and produce stand with the help of friends Daryl (Nathan Dales) and "Squirrely" Dan (K. Trevor Wilson). The self-proclaimed leader of the town "Hicks" believes that he's the toughest guy in town, and neither the meth addicts (aka "Skids"), hockey players, or Pastor Glen's (Jacob Tierney) Christians, can take him. While Wayne continues to prove himself worthy of the title, everyone else around him is dealing with their own problems. 

Is it any good?

This smartly written, irreverent series, which was adapted from a web series titled Letterkenny Problems, is full of quick and quirky one-liners that create lots of actual laugh-out-loud moments. The events that transpire range from silly and strange to downright bizarre. But when woven together, they create a small but oddly endearing universe. 

Some cast members appear deceptively simple at first, but soon reveal themselves be well-developed. Others are more caricature-like, and serve to parody some of the different social groups that personify small-town Canada. It's not for everyone, but Letterkenny proves itself a funny and creative series for those who enjoy off-beat and edgy comedy. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about humor. What makes something funny? Who gets to decide? When does humor go too far?

  • A parody is a humorously exaggerated imitation of something or someone. How does it differ from a stereotype? Do you think LetterKenny parodies people to be mean? Does it go too far? 

TV details

For kids who love silly shows

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