Looped

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Looped TV Poster Image
Time warp buddy comedy is light on consequences.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

The show intends to entertain rather than to educate.

Positive Messages

Luc and Theo learn something from every time loop they experience, but they usually use that knowledge to weasel their way out of trouble they cause. This means there's little consequence for any of their actions and no real resolution for others around them.

Positive Role Models & Representations

On the whole, adults are more jokes than they are effective as role models. To the boys, life is all about fun and games, with little concern for responsible behavior or endeavors such as school.

Violence & Scariness

Physical comedy (an intense game of dodgeball, some slaps and other impact) sometimes ends in bumps, bruises, and black eyes, but they don't last long.

Sexy Stuff
Language

Rarely name-calling such as "loser" and "pukebutt." Lots of gross-out humor (farting, vomiting, poop jokes, smelly earwax).

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Looped is a fast-paced adventure series about two tween boys caught in a time loop that forces them to endlessly repeat the same day. Rather than making good on the opportunity to improve with each new turn, the boys invent ways to have fun, get even with rivals, and escape the monotony of school. There's a fair amount of physicality that leads to bruises, scrapes, and black eyes but nothing that lasts. Bathroom humor also stands out, so expect lots of poop jokes, throwing up, and a recurring scene involving kids trapping a classmate in a box and farting in it.

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What's the story?

LOOPED follows the antics of best friends Luc (voiced by Lyon Smith) and Theo (Kevin Duhaney), who relive the same Monday over and over again in a time loop. Knowing what's coming allows the mischievous boys to alter events to their liking, and that leads to some wacky happenings at home and at school. Trouble ensues and hilarity follows, but Theo and Luc somehow manage to get things back on track in time for the loop to start again.

Is it any good?

Tween boys plus time manipulation are a recipe for fun, but this series misses the opportunity to make the characters' experiences mean something worthwhile. Every new spin on the same day brings more absurd escapades and trouble for those around the boys. In some cases that means bullies get their due or impossibly boring classes take a backseat to adventures of the boys' own making; in others it means their plans need another tweak or two to be full-on outrageous.

But despite opportunities aplenty for Luc and Theo to realize the error of their ways and make better choices, they never do. Instead, Looped plays up the fun of never facing consequences for your actions, which just inspires the characters to raise the bar the next time around. Tack on the frequent bathroom humor -- including a repulsive recurring form of kid-induced torture called a "fart box" -- and this series falls short of meaningful entertainment for kids.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about making good choices. Kids: When (if at all) do Luc and Theo demonstrate good decision-making? What drives their bad decisions? Are you influenced one way or the other by the people and circumstances around you?

  • If you had the opportunity to relive an event from your past and change its course, would you? How do our mistakes teach us lessons?

  • How does this series present adults? Why is it funny to see grown-ups in inferior roles? How does it drive the show's laughs? Does it send negative messages of any kind?

TV details

Themes & Topics

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