Lopez Tonight

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Lopez Tonight TV Poster Image
Host makes late-night history ... but in a crude fashion.

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 14+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Although Lopez talks about the importance of diversity, multiculturalism, and unity, any positive messages are diluted by his use of racial/ethnic stereotypes.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Lopez is the first Latino late-night talk show host in the history of American television.  While not everyone may agree with his attempts to reclaim stereotypes (or his reliance on cultural/ethnic humor, some of which can be pretty crude) he has broken down a lot of barriers.

Violence

Jokes sometimes refer to guns, gang activity, and other violent events.

Sex

Some strong sexual innuendo, including specific references to having sex and to various sexual acts. A celebrity guest dances on a stripper pole, and women are frequently shown dancing in skimpy outfits. One segment asks audience members to guess about the size of a man’s penis.

Language

Words like “bitch” and “ass” are audible; curses like “s--t” are fully bleeped. Lopez also uses a lot of Spanish curse words.

Consumerism

Like any late-night talk show, the series features celebrities promoting their latest projects.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Some jokes refer to drinking and drug use.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this late-night talk/comedy show hosted by comedian George Lopez supposedly celebrates diversity and cultural unity -- but Lopez frequently uses crude humor and racial/ethnic stereotyping to garner laughs. Expect frequent strong language (words like “s--t” are fully bleeped, while those like "bitch" -- and the wide variety of Spanish curses Lopez uses -- aren't) and jokes that refer to a variety of sexual acts, drinking, drug use, guns, and other violent activity. Women are shown in sexy outfits dancing during musical numbers.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 12, 14, 15, and 17 year old Written byMrs Prince December 29, 2009
I luv this show!!!!
Parent of a 10 year old Written byrealitycheck69 February 3, 2010

Caution... Lopez Tonight, a show for adults with an open mind!

Lopez Tonight IS a show for adults, no doubt about it! I Love it, although I can understand the shock everyone is experiencing and the fact that many non-hispa... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old February 2, 2011

Good for older kids.

Really not as kid friendly as Conan. Many bad words and inappropriate skits. Could in fact, be rated TV-MA! Iffy for 13+
Teen, 13 years old Written byCowtails November 20, 2009

Not George Lopez

I was always a huge fan of the George Lopez show. When he came out with his own talk show I thought it be just as funny. I was wrong here me out Lopez tonight i... Continue reading

What's the story?

Hosted by actor/comedian George Lopez, alk/variety/comedy show LOPEZ TONIGHT earns the distinction of being the first American late-night show to be hosted by a Latino performer. The series serves up a glitzy, party-like atmosphere highlighted by female dancers and music performed by the show’s in-house band. Lopez delivers his trademark edgy humor during his opening monologues and throughout various comedy segments that incorporate street interviews and audience participation; celebrity interviews and live musical sets round out each episode.

Is it any good?

LOPEZ TONIGHT offers all of the traditional trappings of late-night entertainment but also attempts to offer messages about diversity, unity, and change inspired by Lopez’s Chicano heritage. The comedian pays homage to multiculturalism by frequently referring to family-inspired racial/ethnic jokes and relying on crude cultural stereotypes (including jokes about the size of Asian genitalia and the racist nature of "white people") for laughs.

Lopez's place in the late-night roster is certainly groundbreaking and may even be inspiring for some. But his overuse of racial/ethnic humor leads to more cheap laughs than empowered moments. And sometimes he just isn't very funny.  As a result, he seems to be undermining the very messages about change and cultural unity that he's trying to promote.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how the media represents different races and ethnicities. Do you think that someone from a specific racial/ethnic background automatically represents his/her community? Should that person automatically consider her/himself a role model for that community?

  • What exactly does “reclaiming” a stereotype mean? Do you think using stereotypes is ever necessary and/or appropriate to make a point?

TV details

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate