Lost Resort

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Lost Resort TV Poster Image
Exotic wellness retreat reality show has some mature themes.

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

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The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

You have to heal yourself and deal with your personal issues to live your best life. It also underscores the idea that emotions are normal and should be worked through. Some of the facilitators reflect common stereotypes about people who practice holistic health. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Facilitators are compassionate, but some seem like they're playing a role vs. practicing healing. Some of the retreat participants are from all walks of life. Not all participants are open to the process. 

Violence

There are conversations about violent events, ranging from sexual abuse to the death of loved ones. Some participants have anger issues. Some argue with each other. Some rituals require participants to channel feelings of rage as a way of working through emotional barriers, and require them to yell and scream. 

Sex

Some folks wear tight-fitting, cleavage revealing outfits. Marital strife and dating problems are themes. One facilitator is a sacred orgasmic dancer, and teaches healing through sexual empowerment. 

Language

Words like "hell" and curses like "s--t." are audible. Uses of "f--k" are bleeped.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

One retreat participate notes addiction as a problem. Ceremonies feature sage burning and the consumption of specific plants and herbs for spiritual cleaning and healing. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Lost Resort is a reality series featuring 9 people and a handful of trained facilitators working through emotional issues at an exotic spiritual wellness retreat in the jungles of Costa Rico. It contains a lot of mature themes, including discussions about traumatic experiences like losing a baby and being sexually abused. Most of these themes are presented within the context of healing. There’s some arguing, stereotyping, and innuendo. One facilitator is a sacred orgasmic dancer, and teaches healing through sexual empowerment. Some of the rituals contain references to sexual acts, while others deal with rage and other emotional issues. Romance blooms between some participants. Cursing includes words like "hell" and "s--t"; any use of "f--k" is bleeped.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byBucklow1982 September 9, 2020
Adult Written byCoolguy247 August 14, 2020

Not fun to watch other people drama like the world really sucks already for real it does

Well i dont like drama or other people problem plus watching it on tv kinda stupid if u ask me about it they try to brain wash people to get there ratings im no... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written byDogcat September 7, 2020

What's the story?

LOST RESORT is a reality series about a group of people seeking emotional recovery at an exotic wellness retreat. Nine individuals struggling with problems like abandonment issues, extreme anger, and emotional detachment travel to a wellness retreat located in the jungles of Costa Rica in search of a healing experience. There they are guided by spiritual leader and Shamanic psychotherapist Chrissie Fire Mane through a series of exercises and ceremonies designed to help them in the healing process. Also working with them are group facilitators like Reiki Master and Ecstatic dancer Atasiea, Oneika, a mindfulness instructor, sacred orgasmic dancer Acqua Xena Heart, and Benjamin, a holistic health coach. Not everyone finds it easy to keep an open mind and embrace the unfamiliar process, but those who do hope to empower themselves to become more fulfilled human beings. 

Is it any good?

Part entertainment and part social experiment, this series offers a voyeuristic look at how a group of dysfunctional people navigate a unique spiritual healing experience. For some participants, the 3-step emotional recovery process in which they are asked to participate offers a way of working through some very difficult trauma. But others do not appear as invested in the overall exercise, or aren’t clear about what they're supposed to be looking for throughout the experience.

The earthier qualities of some of the facilitators are subtly highlighted in ways that pander to stereotypes about holistic health practices and those who practice it. And of course, there’s just enough arguing, catty behavior, and innuendo to remind viewers that it’s a reality show. Thanks to the drama, some folks will find some of what's featured here hokey and amusing. But Lost Resort may also inspire people to open their minds and and look for different and healthy ways to deal with their emotional problems.  

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about spiritual healing. What is it exactly? Where does it come from? Why do people often discount the practice, when in fact they’ve existed for thousands of years? Are the rituals practiced on Lost Resort real spiritual healing exercises, or are they just created for the cameras? 

  • What are some of the stereotypes that exist about people who practice spiritual wellness? Is this TV series challenging them or reinforcing them?

  • How do you manage your own mental health? Does this show inspire you to explore other techniques to achieve spiritual wellness?

TV details

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