Lost Worlds

TV review by
Sierra Filucci, Common Sense Media
Lost Worlds TV Poster Image
Family-friendly history lessons, city by city.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Teaches history. Historical characters are sometimes good and sometimes bad (William Wallace vs. Hitler, for example).

Violence & Scariness

Brief depictions of war, with some blood. Discussion of violent historical events, like the Holocaust.

Sexy Stuff
Language

Occasional "hell."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Potential for mentioning/depicting drinking, though only in a historical context.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this documentary-style educational series has some battle dramatizations, including some minor bloody scenes. Stories of death and injury are common, though not dwelt upon. Experts try, and often succeed, at making history appealing to a broad range of viewers.

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What's the story?

LOST WORLDS is a documentary-style exploration of historically important cities and towns. From Braveheart's Scotland to Hitler's Supercity, experts travel from location to location, analyzing physical, literary, and scientific evidence to piece together clues about the places where history happened. Digital imaging helps recreate what castles, monuments, humble homes, and churches looked like in the past. In the Scotland episode, for example, experts find stone pillars from the thirteenth century that help them imagine what a key bridge looked like -- and discover how William Wallace (aka Braveheart) helped the Scots win an important battle against the British.

Is it any good?

With beautiful landscapes and some exciting discoveries, Lost Worlds is an appealing history lesson. Tweens, teens, and adults who are interested in ancient and modern history and engineering will find the series engaging, though focused primarily on familiar sites and stories. Some dramatizations of battles and other violent episodes might upset very young viewers, but that age group probably won't be interested in this subject matter anyway. Meanwhile, the show's digressions into related artwork, mythology, and literature may help engage viewers with less interest in science and engineering.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the appeal of shows like this. Do they make education fun? Do you think they usually give an accurate representation of the facts? How could you find out more if you wanted to? Families can also discuss the specific locations visited in each episode. Would you want to go there? Why? Have you visited any other historically important places? What locations are important to your family's history?

TV details

  • Premiere date: April 4, 2005
  • Network: History
  • Genre: Educational
  • TV rating: TV-PG
  • Available on: DVD

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